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*** Note: KnowYourInsects.org does its best to include correct identifications of insect photos. It’s always possible that we made a mistake, however, so if you see a misidentification, please contact us and we will correct it. Thanks!

Order Psocoptera: the barklice — Examples

Barklouse, (genus Mesopsocus)
Barklouse, genus Mesopsocus, family Mesopsocidae (the middle barklice). Two additional views follow.
Photographed and identified to order by: Janez Kamin. Identified to genus by: Charles Lienhard, Swiss entomologist and Psocoptera specialist. Location: Nova Gorica, Slovenia (close to Italian border) Alt. 93 m. Date: 30 March 2017. KnowYourInsects.org thanks Dr. Lienhard for the identification. Based on these three photos from Janez, Dr. Lienhard describes this insect as a micropterous female (a female with rudimentary wings) and notes that identification to species “is only possible by examining the genitalia.” Additional photos by Janez are available at the Slovenian Museum of Natural History.
Barklouse, (genus Mesopsocus)
Barklouse, genus Mesopsocus, family Mesopsocidae (the middle barklice).
Photographed and identified to order by: Janez Kamin. Identified to genus by: Charles Lienhard, Swiss entomologist and Psocoptera specialist. Location: Nova Gorica, Slovenia (close to Italian border) Alt. 93 m. Date: 30 March 2017. KnowYourInsects.org says, “You took some beautiful photos, Janez!” Additional photos by Janez are available at the Slovenian Museum of Natural History.
Barklouse, (genus Mesopsocus)
Barklouse, genus Mesopsocus, family Mesopsocidae (the middle barklice).
Photographed and identified to order by: Janez Kamin. Identified to genus by: Charles Lienhard, Swiss entomologist and Psocoptera specialist. Location: Nova Gorica, Slovenia (close to Italian border) Alt. 93 m. Date: 30 March 2017. Janez describes himself as an amateur. He has been providing photos to the Slovenian Museum of Natural History, and the museum’s website posts thousands of his photos. KnowYourInsects.org salutes Janez and his contributions to science!
Common barklice (Order Psocoptera)
Barklice, likely common barklice (Cerastipsocus venosus), family Psocidae, order Psocoptera.
□ Barklice aren’t related to head lice, and have no interest in humans. Rather, they eat fungi, dead bark and other materials, especially on rotting wood. They’ the garden clean-up crew!
Photographed and identified to order by: Don Rideout. Location: San Diego County, California, USA. Date: 3 September 2014.
Common barklice (Order Psocoptera)
□ These are nymphs (immature barklice). As adults, they have wings.
Barklice (close-up), likely common barklice, Cerastipsocus venosus, family Psocidae.
Photographed and identified to order by: Don Rideout. Location: San Diego County, California, USA. Date: 3 September 2014.
Barklice (Order Psocoptera)
Barklice, order Psocoptera.
□ Those with wings are adults. You can also see a couple of immature ones in the photo — they’ the ones without wings.
Photographed by: Maryle Barbé. Location: Florida, USA. Date: 2012.
Common Barklice
Common Barklice, Cerastipsocus venosus, family Psocidae (the common barklice).
□ They sometimes are called "bark cattle" because of their habit of moving together, somewhat like a herd.
Photographed by: Joan Smith. Location: Tampa, Florida, USA. Date: 19 June 2017. Joan says, “These wee ones would fit on a dime with lots of room left over.”
Common Barklice
Common Barklice, Cerastipsocus venosus, family Psocidae (the common barklice).
Photographed by: Joan Smith. Location: Tampa, Florida, USA. Date: 19 June 2017. Joan says, “They were outside in the crack of wood from an old, perhaps rotting, gate. Disturbed them when I looked at repairing the gate.”
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Booklouse
Booklouse, family Liposcelididae (the booklice).
□ Booklice grow to less than 1/16th an inch (KnowYourInsects.org enlarged this photo; otherwise it would look like a speck!). They munch on mold and fungus that sometimes accumulates] in musty old books, which is why they’re called booklice. For more information on these little critters, click here. Photographed by: Lyndsay Doran. Location: Ireland. Date: 19 June 2017. Lyndsay says, “We have found (these) microscopic bugs under our bed and in our closet.”
Booklouse
Booklouse (tentative), family Liposcelididae (the booklice).
Photographed by: Nirav Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org, seconded by entomologist Dr. Erwin “Duke” Elsner. Location: Long Beach, California, USA. Date: 15 October, 2017. Nirav says “We do have books in the same room as the bug was found.”
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Photos at the top of this website are (from left to right): potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) — photo credit: Scott Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture; ebony jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata)— photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; sweat bee (Agapostemon splendens) — photo credit: Natalie Allen and Stephanie Kolski, U.S. Geological Survey; preying mantis, monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), hellgrammite (aka toe biter) larva and eyed click beetle (Alaus oculatus) — photo credit: Leslie Mertz; Halloween pennant (Celithemis eponina) — photo credit: Kay Meng, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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