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*** Note: KnowYourInsects.org does its best to include correct identifications of insect photos. It's always possible that we made a mistake, however, so if you see a misidentification, please contact us and we will correct it. Thanks!

Order Phasmida: the stick insects (or walkingsticks) and leaf insects — Examples
Titan Stick Insect (Acrophylla titan)
Titan Stick Insect, Acrophylla titan, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
Photographed and identified by: Peter Rowell. Location: northern New South Wales, Australia. Date: 15 January, 2017. Peter described this insect as “a rather large Stick Insect about 30cm long.” Yes, that qualifies as rather large, Peter!
Titan Stick Insect (Acrophylla titan)
Titan Stick Insect, Acrophylla titan, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
□ This is the same insect as shown in the previous photo. Its common and scientific names include “titan” — an apt decription!
Photographed and identified by: Peter Rowell. Location: northern New South Wales, Australia. Date: 15 January 2017.
Stick Insect
Stick Insect, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
Photographed by: Meem Sarkar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Date: 15 October 2015.
Northern Walkingstick (Diapheromera femorata)
Northern Walkingstick, female, Diapheromera femorata, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
□ A characteristic of this species is the single stripe running from the head to the abdomen.
Photographed and identified as walkingsticks by: Mechele Harrington. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: Beach City, Texas, USA. Date: 18 August, 2017.
Northern Walkingstick (Diapheromera femorata)
Northern Walkingstick, female, Diapheromera femorata, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
□ This is a great shot of the antennae, which are more than half as long as the body.
Photographed and identified as walkingsticks by: Mechele Harrington. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: Beach City, Texas, USA. Date: 18 August, 2017.
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Northern Walkingstick (Diapheromera femorata)
Northern Walkingstick, female, Diapheromera femorata, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
Photographed by: Logan Bush. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: northwestern Florida, USA. Date: 5 September, 2017. Logan says, “It is about 3–4 inches long (7.6–10.2 cm).
Northern Walkingstick (Diapheromera femorata)
Northern Walkingstick, mating pair, Diapheromera femorata, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
□ As with other species of walkingsticks, the female is much larger than the male.
Photographed and identified as walkingsticks by: Mechele Harrington. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: Beach City, Texas, USA. Date: 18 August, 2017.
Devil Rider (<i>Anisomorpha ferruginea</i>)
Devil Riders, also known as Northern Two-Striped Walkingsticks, Anisomorpha ferruginea, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
□ Look closely! This is actually a mating pair. A small male is on top of the much larger female.
Photographed and identified by: Kelly Ray. Location: Tyler, Texas, USA. Date: 22 June 2017.
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Add your photo here! Devil Rider (<i>Anisomorpha buprestoides</i>)
Devil Riders, or Southern Two-Striped Walkingsticks, Anisomorpha buprestoides, family Phasmatidae (the stick insects).
□ Devil riders are sometimes known as musk mares. This refers to the pungent musky spray that they can emit. It’s an excellent defense mechanism, because the spray is irritating and painful when it comes in contact with the eyes, the mouth and other mucous membranes.
Photographed and identified by: Maryle Barbé. Location: Bonita Springs, Florida, USA. Date: 28 November 2013.


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Unless noted otherwise, photographs on this website are the property of the photographers and may not be reused without written permission from the photographers. To obtain permission, email the photographers here. High-resolution versions of the photographs are available.

Photos at the top of this website are (from left to right): potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) — photo credit: Scott Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture; ebony jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata)— photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; sweat bee (Agapostemon splendens) — photo credit: Natalie Allen and Stephanie Kolski, U.S. Geological Survey; preying mantis, monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), hellgrammite (aka toe biter) larva and eyed click beetle (Alaus oculatus) — photo credit: Leslie Mertz; Halloween pennant (Celithemis eponina) — photo credit: Kay Meng, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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