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*** Note: KnowYourInsects.org does its best to include correct identifications of insect photos. It’s always possible that we made a mistake, however, so if you see a misidentification, please contact us and we will correct it. Thanks!

Order Orthoptera: grasshoppers, katydids and crickets — Examples

Families represented below:
Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers)
Gryllidae (the true crickets)
Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets)
Pyrgomorphidae (the gaudy grasshoppers)
Rhaphidophoridae (the camel crickets, cave weta, cave crickets, and spider crickets)
Romaleidae (the lubber grasshoppers)
Stenopelmatidae (the Jerusalem crickets)
Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets)

Tettigoniidae, the katydids and bush-crickets

Lichen katydid
Lichen Katydid, female, Markia hystrix, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
Photographed by: Charles D. Location: Panama. Date: 25 November, 2016. Charles says, “I saw it in the grass, took it inside to my table to get these snapshots.”
Lichen katydid
Lichen Katydid, female, Markia hystrix, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ Does this katydid have the coolest eyes, or what?!?
Photographed by: Charles D.
Location: Panama. Date: 25 November, 2016. Charles says, “Found at about 4500 feet in western Panama.”
Lichen katydid
Lichen Katydid, female, Markia hystrix, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ A closeup of the ovipositor (the egg-laying structure) that is on the belly side of the females.
Photographed by: Charles D. Location: Panama. Date: 25 November, 2016.
Phaneropterin Katydid
Phaneropterin Katydid, male, genus Barbitistes, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ This species has very short wings.
Photographed and identified to family by: Richard J. B. Wharram. Identified to genus by: orthopterist Roy Kleukers of the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, Netherlands. Thank you, Dr. Kleukers! Location: Monte Palanzone in the Triangolo Lariano (the land mass between the Como & Lecco legs of Lake Como) of the Prealpi Lombarde, Italy. Date: 16 July, 2018.
Phaneropterin Katydid
Phaneropterin Katydid, female, genus Barbitistes, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.

Photographed and identified to family by: Richard J. B. Wharram. Identified to genus by: orthopterist Roy Kleukers of the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, Netherlands. Thank you, Dr. Kleukers! Location: Monte Palanzone in the Triangolo Lariano (the land mass between the Como & Lecco legs of Lake Como) of the Prealpi Lombarde, Italy. Date: 16 July, 2018.
Katydid/bush cricket, Himertula kinneari
Phaneropterin Katydid, female, Himertula kinneari, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ This katydid has an interesting so-called disruptive coloration — the brown and green “disrupt” the outline of the insect, making it more difficult for predators to see and hone in on the katydid. The top photo shows the length of the antennae, while the bottom photo reveals the detail of the body coloration.
Photographed and identified to family by: Axay Chauhan. Identified to species by: entomologist Dr. S.M. Gaikwad, of the Department of Zoology at Shivaji University, Kolhapur, in Maharashtra, India. Thank you Dr. Gaikwad! Location: Girnar, Gujarat, India. Date: 1 October, 2017. Dr. Gaikwad notes that the distribution of this species is India (Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal), Bhutan and Nepal.
Scudder's Bush Katydid
Scudder’s Bush Katydid, nymph (immature), in the genus Scudderia, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ See the next photo for a different angle on this pretty little insect.
Photographed and identified by: Amy Fields.
Location: Yuba City, California, USA. Date: 8 May 2017. Amy says, “Found several of these on my roses.”
Scudder's Bush Katydid
Scudder’s Bush Katydid, genus Scudderia, nymph (immature), subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
Photographed and identified by: Amy Fields.
Location: Warrick County, Indiana, USA. Date: June 2015. Amy says, “Just found picture of scudders bush katydid on your website. That sure looks like my bug. Thanks for a great website.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “You’re welcome!’
Scudder's Bush Katydid
Scudder’s Bush Katydid, genus Scudderia, nymph (immature), subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
Photographed by: Charlie Winstead. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Warrick County, Indiana, USA. Date: June 2015.
Charlie says, “I had trouble keeping him (?) in focus because he was continually on the move. I spotted him on a Japanese maple tree near my front porch.”
Scudder's Bush Katydid
Scudder’s Bush Katydid, nymph (immature), in the genus Scudderia, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ Note the the pollen on its feet. Now that’s a close-up!
Photographed and identified to family by: Gail Rowley, Ozark Stream Photography. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Texas County, Missouri, USA. Date: early May 2012.
Gail says, “I used a macro lens with extensions.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Macro lenses are great when photographing insects!”
Scudder's Bush Katydid
Scudder’s Bush Katydid, nymph (immature), in the genus Scudderia, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ This nymph is sitting on purple poppy mallow — a pretty flower for a pretty nymph!
Photographed and identified to family by: Gail Rowley, Ozark Stream Photography. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Texas County, Missouri, USA. Date: June 2015.
Texas Bush Katydid
Texas Bush Katydid, Scudderia texensis, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ This is a female, and it is a nymph (immature).
Photographed by George (no last name given). Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Humble, Texas, USA. Date: 27 April, 2017.
George says it was about 2 inches long.
Katydid
Angle-Winged Katydid, Microcentrum rhombifolium, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
Photographed by: Meghan Ann Mace. Identified by: Roger Bland, entomologist, professor emeritus, Central Michigan University. Location: Macomb Township, Macomb County, Michigan, USA. Date: 6 August, 2012.
KnowYourInsects says, “Thank you, Dr. Bland, for the identification!”
Speckled Bush-Cricket, Leptophyes punctatissima
Speckled Bush-Cricket, young nymph, Leptophyes punctatissima, subfamily Phaneropterinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets). Note: Phaneropterinae is sometimes elevated to family level: Phaneropteridae.
□ The Speckled Bush-Cricket is a flightless species: The male has tiny elytra (forewings), and the female’s elytra are even more reduced. Neither the male nor the female has hind wings. This is a small species, with a body that only grows to about 1.5 cm (about 0.6 inches) long. The photographer says this nymph was only about 5–6 mm (less than 1/4 inch).
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 30 July, 2018.
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Katydid
Katydid, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets).
□ KnowYourInsects.org has been unable to identify this species of katydid. It looks much like — and has similar aggressive behavior to — the Red-Eyed Devil also known as a Greater Arid Land Katydid (Neobarrettia spinosa). The Red-Eyed Devil is native to the southern United States and Mexico, however, and not found in Indonesia, where this photo was taken.
Photographed by Muhammad Rival Abizar. Identified to family by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Java, Indonesia. Date: 10 July, 2017.
Muhammad says, “I would like to know what (this) insect is, because it bit me hard, and I’ve never seen one like that.”

Katydid, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets).
□ This is one beautiful photo! Zoom in to see the amazing detail, including the speckles. Many katydid nymphs are speckled, similar to this one.
Photographed and identified to family by Antonio Pullano, professional photographer, LovinLife Multimedia. Location: coast of Newport Beach in southern California, USA. Date: 12 July, 2017.
Antonio says, “It was sitting super still on my balcony, noticed its awesome facial features, took the time to create a full production image using a tripod, marco lens, strobe light & reflector.”
Dark Bush Cricket (Pholidoptera griseoaptera)
Dark Bush-Cricket, female, Pholidoptera griseoaptera, subfamily Tettigoniinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets).
□ This is an unusual bush-cricket, because the wings are so small. In fact, they are only barely visible, peeking out from behind the shield-like pronotum. This species is flightless.
Photographed by: Janet Mold. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Barnstaple, England. Date: 28 September, 2017.
Janet says, “I thought it had interesting bobbles on its feet.”
Dark Bush-Cricket (Pholidoptera griseoaptera)
Dark Bush-Cricket, nymph, Pholidoptera griseoaptera, Microcentrum rhombifolium, subfamily Tettigoniinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids and bush-crickets).
□ The Dark Bush-Cricket nymph has a wide, dark stripe running along each side, plus a pair of thinner, lighter-colored stripes down the top of the back.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 30 July, 2018.
Conehead Katydid
Conehead Katydid, nymph (immature), in the genus Neoconocephalus, subfamily Conocephalinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
□ Conehead Katydid nymphs are often quite similar. The shape of the cone — as shown here — can help to tell them apart.
Photographed and identified as a conehead (in the subfamily Conocephalinae, which includes the coneheads and meadow katydids) by: Jeff Goff. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Munising in Alger County, Michigan, USA. Date: 3 September, 2017.
Katydid
Katydid, quite possibly a Robust Conehead, Neoconocephalus robustus, subfamily Conocephalinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
Photographed and identified to order by: Teddi Showalter. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Date: 16 April, 2017.
Katydid (Euconocephalus)
Katydid, Euconocephalus, subfamily Conocephalinae family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
Photographed by: Devendra Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Khargone, Madhya, Pradesh, India. Date: 26 October, 2017.
Katydid (Euconocephalus)
Katydid, Euconocephalus, subfamily Conocephalinae family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
Photographed by: Devendra Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Khargone, Madhya, Pradesh, India. Date: 25 October, 2017.
Katydid (Euconocephalus)
Katydid, Euconocephalus, subfamily Conocephalinae family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
Photographed by: Devendra Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Khargone, Madhya, Pradesh, India. Date: 26 October, 2017.
Katydid
Straight-Lanced Meadow Katydid, also known as a Striped Katydid, female, Conocephalus strictus, subfamily Conocephalinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
□ The female Straight-Lanced Meadow Katydid has a long speak-shaped ovipositor extending from her rear. The male of this species, on the other hand, has a pair of short and sharp-looking cerci extending from his rear end. Both males and females have very short wings that don’t even cover half of the abdomen.
Photographed by: Maryle Barbé. Location: Arcadia, Michigan, USA. Date: 2013.
Common True Katydid (Pterophylla camellifolia)
Common True Katydid, sometimes called a Northern Katydid or Rough-Winged Katydid, male, Pterophylla camellifolia, subfamily Pseudophyllinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
□ Males have that brown, crinkly-looking, triangular patch (known as a saddle) on the back. Females don’t have the patch.
Photographed by: Henry Neimark. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Massachusetts, USA. Date: 1 August, 2012.
Common True Katydid (Zabalius aridus)
Common True Katydid, sometimes called a Northern Katydid or Rough-Winged Katydid, male, Pterophylla camellifolia, subfamily Pseudophyllinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
□ The “song” of a katydid is a pattern of short buzzy notes that it produces not by singing, but by rubbing a “file” against a “scraper.” The file is a row of serrated teeth (called a file) on its upper wing, and the scraper is a stiff portion of its lower wing. This manner of noisemaking is called stridulation. To hear the sound made by this katydid and a few others, click here. Photographed by: Henry Neimark. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Massachusetts, USA. Date: 1 August, 2012.
Henry describes it as an “amazing leaf-mimicking insect.”
Common True Katydid (Zabalius aridus)
Common True Katydid, sometimes called a Northern Katydid or Rough-Winged Katydid, male, Pterophylla camellifolia, subfamily Pseudophyllinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
□ The Common True Katydid often hangs out in the treetops, so it usually goes unseen. The photographer found this one “in greenery we cut for a wedding.” Grasshoppers are considered good luck by many cultures, so maybe this katydid also portends happy times for the newly wedded couple!
Photographed and identified to family by: Connie Taylor. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Date: 5 July, 2018.
Connie says, “His face is fierce!”
Katydid (Sathrophyllia)
Katydid, Sathrophyllia, subfamily Pseudophyllinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
□ This amazingly cryptic katydid rests in this unusual pose: forelegs held forward, middle legs out to the sides, and hind legs hidden beneath its wings. To get a better view of the head, see the next photo.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nitulemada, Digana, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 29 June, 2018.
Katydid (Sathrophyllia)
Katydid, Sathrophyllia, subfamily Pseudophyllinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
□ Look closely to see the eyes of this katydid. Its head it tilted down, so its mouthparts are not visible. Note also the prominent knob on its thorax.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nitulemada, Digana, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 26 June, 2018.
Katydid (Zabalius aridus)
Katydid (no common name), Zabalius aridus, subfamily Pseudophyllinae, family Tettigoniidae (the katydids).
□ This katydid was found in a mango orchard, not far from Botswana’s capital city of Gaborone.
Photographed by: Farouk Pandor. Identified by: Professor Mike Picker of the University of Capetown. Location: Lobatswe, Botswana, Africa. Date: 16 November, 2017.
Professor Picker notes that the university has published a new app that features approximately 1,700 species of insects from South Africa. KnowYourInsects.org says, “Thank you, Professor Picker for the identification of this katydid and for the information about the app!”
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Add your photo here!

Gryllotalpidae, the mole crickets

Mole cricket (<i>Dissosteria
carolina</i>)
Mole cricket, genus Gryllotalpa, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
□ Those are some powerful digging legs in front!
Photographed by Dexter "Alex" Ponomarenko (Александр Пономаренко). Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Makarov, Kiev Oblast, Ukraine. Date: 15 April, 2014.
Mole cricket (<i>Dissosteria
carolina</i>)
Mole cricket, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
Photographed by Dr. Modikwe Aleck Raphala. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Spruitview in Ekurhuleni, Gauteng South Africa. Date: 11 October, 2016.
Dr. Raphala says, “I was sitting in my TV room watching TV when saw this funny and scary insect crawling on the floor.”
Mole cricket
Mole cricket, possibly Tawny Mole Cricket, Neoscapteriscus vicinus, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
Photographed by Anita Willman. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: north of Houston, Texas, USA. Date: 6 Feburary, 2017.
After seeing the other mole crickets posted on this page, Anita says, “Was actually cool to see different kinds of mole crickets. Mine is the prettiest!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Spoken like a true insect-lover!”
Mole cricket
Northern Mole Cricket, Neocurtilla hexadactyla), family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
□ Listen to the song of the Northern Mole Cricket here.
Photographed by Scott Quintilliano. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Muskegon County, Michigan, USA. Date: 30 May, 2017.
Scott says, “It is about 2–2.5 inches long and about a half-inch wide.”
Mole cricket
Northern Mole Cricket, genus Neocurtilla hexadactyla, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
□ Mole crickets typically live in underground tunnels during the daylight hours, so few people see them.
Photographed by Pete Wildman. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Port St. Lucie, Florida, USA. Date: 9 June, 2017.
Pete says, “What is this bug?? The stubby front legs made them seem mole-like. Any ideas?! I’m dying to know!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “We love Pete’s enthusiasm! And “mole&rddquo; is a perfect description.”
Mole cricket
Short-Winged Mole Cricket, Neoscapteriscus abbreviatus, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
□ The Short-Winged Mole Cricket has very short wings, and the hind wings are shorter than the forewings. This is true even in nymphs (immatures) of this species: The hind wings are shorter than the forewings.
Photographed by Pete Wildman. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Port St. Lucie, Florida, USA.
Date: 9 June, 2017. Pete says, “There were a bunch of them on my patio.”
Mole cricket
Short-Winged Mole Cricket, Neoscapteriscus abbreviatus, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
□ This mole cricket measures about 1.5 inches long (3.8 cm).
Photographed by: Casey Brechtel. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Galveston Island, Texas, USA. Date: 25 August, 2017.
Casey says, “ These came out (just showed up) right before (hurricane) Harvey hit. I have never seen any before and lived in Galveston for 20 years. Pic is on my jacket sleeve.”
Mole cricket
Mole Cricket, possibly Tawny Mole Cricket, Neoscapteriscus vicinus, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
□ For details about how to distinguish similar species of North American mole crickets, click here. They’re tricky!
Photographed by: Sheldon L. Boyd. Identified by: Audrey Maran. Location: The Villages Florida, USA. Date: 1 March, 2017.
Mole cricket
Mole Cricket in the genus Gryllotalpa, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
□ The photographer found this mole cricket under a rock in the Sierra Nevada mountains at a altitude of 1200 meters (nearly 4,000 feet).
Photographed by: Angela Blickle. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sierra Nevada mountains, Spain. Date: circa 2008.
Mole cricket
Mole Cricket in the genus Gryllotalpa, family Gryllotalpidae (the mole crickets).
□ According to mole-cricket expert Roy Kleukers of the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, Netherlands, “It is very difficult to identify Gryllotalpa species from Italy. Several species have been described based on the number of chromosomes, without clear morphological characters.”
Photographed by: Umberto Prisco. Identified to genus by: Roy Kleukers. Location: Napoli, Italy. Date: 28 January, 2018.

Rhaphidophoridae, the camel crickets, cave weta, cave crickets, and spider crickets

Camel cricket (<i>Ceuthophilus</i> spp)
Camel Cricket, female, in the genus Ceuthophilus , family Rhaphidophoridae (the camel crickets, cave weta, cave crickets, and spider crickets).
□ Camel Cricket are wingless and have large hind legs and long antennae. They prefer damp locations. See a close-up in the next photo.
Photographed by: Daisy Rulz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 September, 2017.
Camel cricket (<i>Ceuthophilus</i> spp)
Camel Cricket, female, in the genus Ceuthophilus , family Rhaphidophoridae (the camel crickets, cave weta, cave crickets, and spider crickets).
□ Females (like this one) have a spear-like ovipositor extending from the rear of the abdomen. She uses the ovipositor to lay eggs.
Photographed by: Daisy Rulz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 September, 2017.
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Gryllidae, the true crickets

Two-spotted tree cricket (<i>Neoxabea bipunctata</i>)
Two-Spotted Tree Cricket, Neoxabea bipunctata, family Gryllidae (the true crickets).
□ As shown in this photo, Two-Spotted Tree Crickets usually have two dark spots in the middle of the back. Sometimes, however, there are no dark spots.
Photographed and identified by Charles Drummond. Location: Plymouth, Michigan, USA. Date: 18 September, 2015.
Two-spotted tree cricket (<i>Neoxabea bipunctata</i>)
Two-Spotted Tree Cricket, male, Neoxabea bipunctata, family Gryllidae (the true crickets).
□ The male Two-Spotted Tree Cricket has round, knob-like structures running down the abdomen, which are visible beneath the see-through wings on this specimen. The photographer says he was about 2 inches long (5 cm). See the photographer’s comments below.
Photographed by Wanda Vanderveer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Woodbury, New York Date: 16 August, 2018.
Wanda spotted this while working a part-time job on the New York State Thruway. She says, “My station has beautiful natural scenery around it, and that picture is taken of the window ledge of a toll booth.”
Snowy tree cricket (<i>Oecanthus fultoni</i>)
Snowy Tree Cricket, Oecanthus fultoni, family Gryllidae (the true crickets).
Photographed by Amy Williams. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Polson, Montana, USA. Date: 7 September, 2016.
Ms. Williams teaches at Polson Middle School in Montana, and took this photo during 7th period in the school garden. She says, “It is funny that just a few days before we spotted this fabulous creature, we were talking about how some crickets can tell you the temperature if you learn the formula, but we couldn't find any crickets to test this theory.”
Tree cricket (<i>Oecanthus</i>)
Tree Cricket, Oecanthus spp., family Gryllidae (the true crickets).
Photographed by Abhiroop Singh Gill. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Amritsar, India. Date: 18 December, 2016.
Tree cricket
Juvenile tree cricket, possibly a Tamarack Tree Cricket, Oecanthus laricis, or a Pine Tree Cricket, Oecanthus pini, family Gryllidae (the true crickets).
□ The short wing buds distinguish this as a juvenile. Juveniles cannot fly. When it becomes an adult, the wings will be larger and fully developed ... and ready for flight.
Photographed by: Paula Spolarich. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Brady’s Run Park in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 24 September, 2016.
Tarbinskiellus terrificus
Cricket (no common name), Tarbinskiellus terrificus, family Gryllidae (the true crickets).
□ With the wonderful orange and red coloration, the species names of “terrificus” is well-suited to this cricket!
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India. Location: Udanti Wildlife Sanctuary, Gariyaband district, Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 28 June, 2014.
Broad-winged Tree Cricket (Oecanthus latipennis)
Broad-winged Tree Cricket, Oecanthus latipennis, subfamily Oecanthinae, family Gryllidae (the true crickets).
□ To here this cricket’s soft song, click here.
Photographed by: Amber Swably. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Indiana, USA. Date: 23 September, 2017.
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Pyrgomorphidae, the gaudy grasshoppers

Short-horned gaudy grasshopper (<i>Neorthacris simulans</i> spp.)
Short-Horned Gaudy Grasshopper Neorthacris simulans, family Pyrgomorphidae (the gaudy grasshoppers).
□ Unlike most other adult grasshoppers, the adults in this family are wingless.
Photographed by Ajay Antony. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamil Nadu, India. Date: 12 May, 2017.
Aularches miliaris miliaris
Pyrgomorphid Grasshopper (no common name), male, Aularches miliaris miliaris, family Pyrgomorphidae (the gaudy grasshoppers).
□ The yellow spots are quite noticeable against the dark brown of the wings. See the close-up of the thorax and head in the next photo.
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India. Location: Udanti Wildlife Sanctuary, Gariyaband district, Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 27 October, 2012.
Aularches miliaris miliaris
Pyrgomorphid Grasshopper (no common name), male, Aularches miliaris miliaris, family Pyrgomorphidae (the gaudy grasshoppers).
□ Note the ornate (tuberculate) thorax, the blue-green color of the head, and the slender white striping on the antennae.
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India. Location: Udanti Wildlife Sanctuary, Gariyaband district, Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 27 October, 2012.
Poekilocerus pictus
Ak Grasshopper, adult (top) and nymph (bottom), Poekilocerus pictus, family Pyrgomorphidae (the gaudy grasshoppers).
□ Zoom in to see the color and detail of these beautiful grasshoppers!
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India. Location: Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 22 July, 2012.
Poekilocerus pictus
Ak Grasshopper, adult and nymphs, Poekilocerus pictus, family Pyrgomorphidae (the gaudy grasshoppers).
□ At least a dozen Ak Grasshoppers — mainly nymphs — are crowding on this stem!
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India. Location: Sitanadi Wildlife Sanctuary, Dhamtari District, Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 19 June, 2012.
Ak Grasshopper (Acrida indica)
Ak Grasshopper, adult, Poekilocerus pictus, family Pyrgomorphidae (the gaudy grasshoppers).
Photographed by: Devendra Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Khargone, Madhya, Pradesh, India. Date: 24 September, 2017.
Gaudy Grasshopper (Pyrogomorpha spp)
Gaudy Grasshopper, possibly Pyrgomorpha conica, family Pyrgomorphidae (the gaudy grasshoppers).
Photographed by: Devendra Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Khargone, Madhya, Pradesh, India. Date: 28 September, 2017.
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Romaleidae, the lubber grasshoppers

Poekilocerus pictus
Eastern Lubber Grasshopper, Romalea microptera (also known as Romalea guttata), family Romaleidae (the lubber grasshoppers).
□ This is a large, but rather slow-moving grasshopper that plods along. Sometimes, its population numbers can soar and these grasshoppers can cause considerable crop damage.
Photographed by: Sheldon L. Boyd. Identified by: Audrey Maran. Thank you, Audrey! Location: alongside the Rainbow River in Florida. Date: 23 August, 2017.
KnowYourInsects.org says, “The photographer captured all the beauty of this grasshopper. Nice photo, Sheldon!”
Poekilocerus pictus
Eastern Lubber Grasshopper, Romalea microptera (also known as Romalea guttata), family Romaleidae (the lubber grasshoppers).
□ Notice that this species has two scientific names. Most scientists use Romalea microptera because it is an older and familiar scientific name, but many actually consider Romalea guttata to be the “more correct” scientific name.
Photographed by: Sheldon L. Boyd. Identified by: Audrey Maran. Thank you, Audrey! Location: alongside the Rainbow River in Florida. Date: 23 August, 2017.
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Stenopelmatidae, the Jerusalem crickets

Jerusalem cricket (<i>Stenopelmatus</i> spp.)
Jerusalem Cricket in the genus Stenopelmatus, family Stenopelmatidae (the Jerusalem crickets).
□ These large, flightless insects can grow to be 2 inches long!
Photographed by Stan Jones. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: eastern Washington state, USA.
Date: 22 August, 2016.
Stan says, “It was in the middle of a dirt path, in a very dry region on a 95 degree day, out mid-day. It didn’t move when we approached and let me get my phone about 2 ft away for a picture.”
Jerusalem cricket (<i>Stenopelmatus fuscus</i> spp.)
Jerusalem Cricket, Stenopelmatus fuscus, family Stenopelmatidae (the Jerusalem crickets).
Photographed by Daphne Marchant. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: just north of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Date: 22 August, 2016.
Her friend Chris says, “(She) took the picture of this insect on a trail in the foothills just north of Salt Lake City, near the University of Utah.”
Jerusalem cricket (<i>Stenopelmatus</i> spp.)
Jerusalem Cricket in the genus Stenopelmatus, family Stenopelmatidae (the Jerusalem crickets).
Photographed by Justin Gilles. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Palm Springs, California, USA. Date: 20 January, 2018.
Justin says, “This was in a swimming pool.”
Jerusalem cricket (Stenopelmatus fuscus)
Jerusalem Cricket, Stenopelmatus fuscus, family Stenopelmatidae (the Jerusalem crickets).
□ The antennae are quite long, although they are a bit difficult to see on this background.
Photographed and identified by: Bill Mertz. Location: Bellflower, California, USA. Date: 12 November, 2017.
Bill notes that this species is also known as niño de la tierra, which means “child of the earth.” He says, “Apparently, the large head (and an active imagination) gives the impression of a child. I’ve also heard people call them ‘potato bugs.’ But from my experience, most people call them... ‘eeeeek!’”
Jerusalem cricket (Stenopelmatus fuscus)
Jerusalem Cricket, Stenopelmatus fuscus, family Stenopelmatidae (the Jerusalem crickets).
□ This photo of the underside of a Jerusalem Cricket shows its strong jaws, which are perfect for chewing roots (and are also good for defending themselves from human fingers). They also have spiny legs (as shown) that help them dig into the soil.
Photographed and identified by: Bill Mertz. Location: Bellflower, California, USA. Date: 12 November, 2017.
Bill says, “They are very common out here.”

Acrididae, the short-horned grasshoppers

Pallid-Winged Grasshopper (Trimerotropis pallidipennis)
Pallid-Winged Grasshopper, Trimerotropis pallidipennis, subfamily Oedipodinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ The Pallid-Winged Grasshopper belongs to a subfamily called the Band-Winged Grasshoppers (subfamily Oedipodinae), and it is easy to see why. This looks very similar to the California Rose-Winged Grasshopper (Dissosteira pictipennis), but the California Rose-Winged Grasshopper has a ridge running down the center of the pronotum (the “shield” over its thorax).
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas' full-size image here. Location: South San Francisco, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 9 June, 2017.
Carolina Locust (<i>Dissosteria
carolina</i>)
Carolina Locust, Dissosteria carolina, subfamily Oedipodinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ The hind wings are hidden when the insect is not flying. When it flies, however, the hind wings open like a fan. Each hind wing is black with a wide light-yellow trim, and you can see a bit of the hind wing peeking out in this photo.
Photographed by Amanda McCreless. Identified by: Sara Mitchell. Location: Lapeer County, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 July, 2010.
Grasshopper
Acridid Grasshopper (no common name), Dittopternis venusta, subfamily Oedipodinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India Location: Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 9 July, 2011.
Red-legged grasshopper (<i>Melanoplus
femur-rubrum</i>)
Red-legged grasshopper, Melanoplus femur‐rubrum (sometimes spelled without the hyphen), subfamily Melanoplinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ This is one of the short-horned grasshoppers. The term “short-horned” refers to their relatively short antennae.
Photographed by Amanda McCreless. Identified by: Sara Mitchell. Location: Washtenaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 26 July, 2010.
Differential Grasshopper (Melanoplus differentialis)
Differential Grasshopper, Melanoplus differentialis, subfamily Melanoplinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ Note the distinctive chevron markings on its hind-leg femur.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas' full-size image here. Location: South San Francisco, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 5 December, 2017.
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Xenocatantops humilis
Acridid Grasshopper (no common name), Xenocatantops humilis humilis, subfamily Catantopinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India Location: Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 28 June, 2014.
Diabolocatantops innotabilis
Acridid Grasshopper (no common name), Diabolocatantops innotabilis, subfamily Catantopinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India Location: Barnawapara Wildlife Sanctuary, Raipur district, Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 28 September, 2007.
Acridid Grasshopper (Diabolocatantops spp)
Acridid Grasshopper, genus Diabolocatantops, subfamily Catantopinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
Photographed by: Devendra Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dondwada, Madhya, Pradesh, India. Date: 29 September, 2017.
Cyrtacanthacris tatarica
Brown Spotted Locust, Cyrtacanthacris tatarica, subfamily Cyrtacanthacridinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ According to a 2014 research paper in the Journal of Insect Science, it is found “in the scattered vegetation of grasses, herbs, and shrubs” and it is a solitary species, so it does not swarm as many other locusts do.” Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India. Location: Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 4 June, 2012.
Cyrtacanthacris tatarica
Brown Spotted Locust, Cyrtacanthacris tatarica, subfamily Cyrtacanthacridinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ The striped eyes and the spines on each hind-leg tibia (“shins”) are clearly visible in this beautiful photo.” Photographed by: Abhishek Gawande. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Satara, Maharashtra, India. Date: 29 September, 2018.
Grasshopper
American Grasshopper, also known as American Bird Grasshopper, Schistocerca americana, subfamily Cyrtacanthacridinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ This grasshopper can become extremely numerous under certain conditions.
Photographed and identified to order by: Maryle Barbé. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Florida, USA. Date: 2013.
Teratodes monticollis
Hooded Grasshopper, Teratodes monticollis, subfamily Teratodinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ The expanded and shield-like pronotum gives this grasshopper the appearance of a leaf — excellent camouflage!
Photographed and identified by: Dr. Kailash Chandra and Sunil Kumar Gupta, Zoological Survey of India. Location: Chhattisgarh, India. Date: 15 July, 2011.
Silent Slant-Faced Grasshopper (Acrida indica)
Silent Slant-Faced Grasshopper, Acrida indica, subfamily Acridinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
Photographed by: Devendra Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Khargone, Madhya, Pradesh, India. Date: 29 September, 2017.
Silent Slant-Faced Grasshopper (Acrida cinerea)
Silent Slant-Faced Grasshopper, Acrida cinerea, subfamily Acridinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ Many of the 40-plus species of grasshoppers in this subfamily — Acridinae — have no specific common names, and so are listed under the general name of Silent Slant-Faced Grasshoppers.
Photographed by: Devendra Solanki. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Khargone, Madhya, Pradesh, India. Date: 29 September, 2017.
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Acrida exaltata
Slant-Faced Grasshopper, Acrida exaltata, subfamily Acridinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ For this Slant-Faced Grasshopper, the antennae are coming out of the top of the head, and the mouthparts can be seen near the front legs — now that’s a slanted face!
Photographed and identified as a grasshopper by: K J Westman. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nithulemada, Digana, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 6 March, 2018.
K J found this grasshopper at 11 p.m. on the house veranda in Sri Lanka. KnowYourInsects.org says, “Great shot, K J!”
Clip-Wing Grasshopper (Metaleptea brevicornis)
Clip-Wing Grasshopper, Metaleptea brevicornis, subfamily Gomphocerinae, family Acrididae (the short-horned grasshoppers).
□ It is called a Clip-Wing Grasshopper because of the angled edge on the back of the long forewings (the hind wings are hidden under the forewings).
Photographed by: J.J. Ford. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Shelby County, eastern Texas, USA. Date: 19 August, 2018.

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Photos at the top of this website are (from left to right): potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) — photo credit: Scott Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture; ebony jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata)— photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; sweat bee (Agapostemon splendens) — photo credit: Natalie Allen and Stephanie Kolski, U.S. Geological Survey; preying mantis, monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), hellgrammite (aka toe biter) larva and eyed click beetle (Alaus oculatus) — photo credit: Leslie Mertz; Halloween pennant (Celithemis eponina) — photo credit: Kay Meng, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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