Insect logo



Home Who We Are List of Orders References Contact Us

*** Note: KnowYourInsects.org does its best to include correct identifications of insect photos. It’s always possible that we made a mistake, however, so if you see a misidentification, please contact us and we will correct it. Thanks!

Order Hemiptera: the true bugs — Examples
Families represented below:
Suborder Heteroptera:
Acanthosomatidae (the shield bugs)
Belostomatidae (the giant water bugs)
Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs)
Gerridae (the water striders)
Lygaeidae (the milkweed bugs and seed bugs)
Miridae (the plant bugs, leaf bugs, and grass bugs)
Nepidae (the water scorpions)
Pentatomidae (the stink bugs)
Reduviidae (the assassin bugs)
Rhopalidae (the scentless plant bugs)
Rhyparochromidae, (the dirt-colored seed bugs)
Scutelleridae (the metallic shield bugs or jewel bugs)
Suborder Auchenorrhyncha:
Cercopidae (the spittle bugs and froghoppers)
Cicadellidae (the leafhoppers)
Cicadidae (the cicadas)
Flatidae (the flatid planthoppers)
Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers)
Issidae (the issid planthoppers)
Membracidae (the treehoppers and thorn bugs)
Suborder Sternorrhyncha:
superfamily Aphidoidea (the aphids)
Coccidae (the soft scale insects)

Coreidae, (the leaf-footed bugs)

Giant Mesquite Bug Nymph
Giant Mesquite Bug, nymph (immature), in the genus Thasus (possibly a color variation of Thasus acutangulus, but that remains unverified), family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Although the insects in this and the following photo are both called Giant Mesquite Bugs, they are actually different species.
Photographed by: Tino Garcia. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Fortin de las Flores, Veracruz, Mexico. Date: 13 April, 2014.
Thalus neocalifornicus
Giant Mesquite Bug, nymph (immature), Thasus neocalifornicus, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ These nymphs can give off a bad-tasting secretion to help protect them from enemies, such as birds. Their bright colors warn birds to stay away.
Photographed by: Carol P. Byram. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tucson, Arizona, USA. Date: 17 July, 2017. Carol says, “I have a big old mesquite tree in the back yard. Funny I’ve never seen one of these before, as I’ve lived in this house 12 years.”
Add your photo here!
Mozena obtusa
Leaf-Footed Bug, nymph (immature), Mozena obtusa, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The adult version of this bug looks quite different. To see the adults at the excellent bugguide.org website, click here.
Photographed by: Shara Hinchey. Identified by: Ed Bynum, Ph.D, extension entomologist, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center. Location: Amarillo, Texas, USA. Date: 8 August, 2014.
Florida Leaf-Footed Bug (Acanthocephala femorata)
Florida leaf-footed bug, male, Acanthocephala femorata, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The male has a considerably enlarged hind-leg femur, as well as a spike that extends back from about the center of that enlarged femur. Both the enlarged hind-leg femur and spine are visible here.
Photographed by: Terry C. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Acworth, Georgia, USA. Date: 11 November, 2015.
Coreidae
Leaf-Footed Bug, Acanthocephala terminalis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ One characteristic feature of this bug is the orange tips on the ends of its antennae.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska, Michigan, USA. Date: 8 July, 2012.
Acanthocephala terminalis nymph
Leaf-Footed Bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephala terminalis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed and identified by: Tricia Bergstue and Jamie Haight. “One cool leaf-footed insect nymph!” Location: Busti, Chautauqua County, New York, USA. Date: 4 July, 2014.
Coreidae
Leaf-Footed Bug, nymph (immature), Acanthocephala terminalis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Anne Fiore. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Spring Lake, Michigan, USA. Date: 3 August, 2014.
Leaf-Footed Bug (<i>Acanthocephala</i>)
Leaf-footed bug, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Bernard Solomon. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Monroe Township, New Jersey, USA. Date: 7 September, 2016. Bernard says, “There seem to be many of the insects on what appear to be seed pods of the tree, however this is the first year I have noticed the insects on the tree.”
Giant Leaf-footed bug
Giant Leaf-Footed Bug, nymph (immature), genus Acanthocephalus declivis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This bug is about 1.5 inches long!
Photographed by: Naj Kandala. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Houston, Texas, USA. Date: March, 2017. Naj says, “I am hoping that my daughter will now do her kindergarten bug project on it.”
Leaf-footed bug
Leaf-Footed Bug, nymph (immature), genus Acanthocephalus, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: J. Carmack. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Winchester, Tennessee, USA. Date: 10 July, 2016. J. Carmack says, “First time I have ever seen this type of insect.”
Leaf-footed bug
Leaf-Footed Bug, nymph (immature), likely Acanthocephala terminalis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Jon Wilco. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Northern New England, USA. Date: 6 September, 2017.
Western Leaf-Footed Bug
Western Leaf-Footed Bug, Leptoglossus zonatus, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Three species share the common name Western Leaf-Footed Bug. All of them have the white zigzag across the back (really the wings). This species, Leptoglossus zonatus, is distinguished by the two light-colored spots behind the head.
Photographed by: Susan Clarke-Romero. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bakersfield, California, USA. Date: 4 July, 2017. Susan says, “He stopped me dead in my tracks! It’s nice to know what he is.” KnowYourInsects.org would also like to thank Susan’s dad Jim for originally sending in the photo.
Western Leaf-Footed Bug
Western Leaf-Footed Bug, Leptoglossus clypealis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The scientific species name of clypealis refers to the small needle-like structure on the front of the head, which is visible in this photo — that is, if you look closely! That structure is actually an extension of a plate, called a clypeus, on the insect’s “face”.
Photographed by: Pam Meintzer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Johnstown, Colorado, USA. Date: 12 October, 2016. Pam says, “Ahhhhhhhhh!!!! It is huge and creepy looking. I don’t know what it is; hope you know!”
Western Leaf-Footed Bug
Western Leaf-Footed Bug, Leptoglossus clypealis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Note the wide flair on the hind legs. It almost looks like a leaf, and that is the origin of the name “leaf-footed”.
Photographed and identified by: Chris McClelland. Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Date: 13 October, 2017. Chris photographed this bug on a bench in her backyard.
Leaf-footed Pine Seed Bug (Leptoglossus corculus)
Leaf-footed Pine Seed Bug, Leptoglossus corculus, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This species has three small white dots, as well as an often-faint and blurred white zigzag on its back. The three white dots are visible in this photo, but not the zigzag pattern. Another feature of this species is the series of light-colored lines that run along each side of its abdomen. If you zoom in, you can see them (especially along the lower part of the abdomen in this photo).
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dutchess County, New York, USA. Date: 15 September, 2017.
Add your photo here!
Add your photo here!
Western Conifer Seed Bug
Western Conifer Seed Bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This insect is actually native to the western United States, which is why it is called the Western Conifer Seed Bug. It started to march east around the middle of the 20th century, and is now found in the northeastern United States too.
Photographed and identified by: Karen Dillon. Location: Berlin, Vermont, USA. Date: 10 March, 2017. Karen says, “Climbing on my indoor window in the first week of March! Maybe escaped from some potting soil. I love the little ‘alien face’ on his upper back.”
Western Conifer Seed Bug
Western Conifer Seed Bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ When cooler weather sets in, these insects will sometimes seek shelter indoors. They don’t bite, but if they feel threatened (e.g., if you try to pick one up), they may emit a pungent odor. That’s their defense mechanism!
Photographed by: Cindy Karch. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Macungie, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 8 August, 2017. Cindy says, “So cool! ... It's really beautiful.”
Leaf-footed bug
Leaf-Footed Bug (underside), family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Deb Paron. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sumpter Township, Michigan, USA. Date: 28 September, 2015. Deb says, “I was fascinated by its abdomen — it looks exactly like a hand grenade!”
Coreidae
Squash Bug, nymph (immature), Gonocerus juniperi, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Werner Kaufmann. Identified by: a German entomologist who wished to remain anonymous. Location: Vienna, Austria. Date: 1 August, 2015.
Cactus bug
Cactus Bug, nymph (immature), Chelinidea vittiger, family Coreidae (the leaf-footed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is also sometimes called a Prickly Pear Cactus Bug. This nymph is actually on a cactus, and you can see some of the damage (white spots).
Photographed by: H. Barton/hbd images. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Arizona, USA. Date: 12 April, 2017. H. Barton says, “I found dozens of these 1/8"–1/4" insects on my cactus in Arizona.”

Reduviidae (the assassin bugs)

Wheel bug
Wheel Bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Notice the distinctive, spiky crest behind the head.
Photographed and identified by: Charlie Winstead. Location: Warrick County, Indiana, USA. Date: November, 2014. Charlie says, “These were taken on a cool November day in 2014, so he/she wasn’t moving too quickly.”
Wheel bug
Wheel Bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is a great shot of its long, red, spear-like beak!
Photographed and identified by: Charlie Winstead. Location: Warrick County, Indiana, USA. Date: November, 2014. Charlie says, “I find the fine details of these creatures - too small for most folks to resolve with the naked eye - just incredible!” KnowYourInsects.org could not agree more!
Wheel bug
Wheel Bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Adult wheel bugs are 1–1.25 inches long.
Photographed by: Lori Fioravanti. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Orefield, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 26 September, 2016. Lori says, “I had never seen anything like them before (so unusual looking) and was so curious about them.”
Wheel bug
Pair of Wheel Bugs, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ It’s hard to see the crests from this vantage point, but take a look at the next photo taken from a different angle!
Photographed by: Fletcher White. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Date: 26 September, 2016.
Wheel bug
Wheel Bugs, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is a side view of the previous photo.
Photographed by: Fletcher White. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Date: 26 September, 2016.
Wheel bug
Wheel Bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Notice how the flattened edges of the abdomen curl up slightly.
Photographed by: Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: August 2015. Carlo says it “looks like a leaf.”
Wheel bug
Wheel Bug, Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Darla Lee. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Virginia, USA. Date: 8 October, 2016. Darla says, “My daughter discovered it this morning on our patio. We were very curious as to what kind of insect it was so we began looking it up on line. I loved how KnowYourInsects asked questions and narrowed the search for us.” We at KnowYourInsects.org are very happy to help :-)
Wheel bug larva
Wheel Bug, nymph (immature), Arilus cristatus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is a great photo of the nymph of the wheelbug. Compare it to the photos of adults posted just before this one.
Photographed by: Jeremiah and Caitriona Kane. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: East Bradford, Pennsylvania. Date: 16 July, 2017. “My wife, daughter and I were having a lot of fun trying to figure out what it was so you responding so quickly made our night.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “This photo was a family affair: Louise found it, and her husband Jere and daughter Caitriona snapped the photo! Nice group effort, Kane family!”
Bee Killer Assassin Bug
Bee Killer Assassin Bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Peter Rowell. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Coopers Shoot (between Bangalow and Byron Bay), northern New South Wales, Australia. Date: 15 January, 2017. Peter says he found it “on a Passion Fruit vine on the far north coast of NSW.”
Bee Killer Assassin Bug
Bee Killer Assassin Bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is the side view of the previous photo. Notice the recurved beak extending back and under the head.
Photographed by: Peter Rowell. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Coopers Shoot (between Bangalow and Byron Bay), northern New South Wales, Australia. Date: 15 January, 2017.
Reduviid
Assassin Bug, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Notice the beak that extends backward from the head. Assassin bugs use the beak to stab prey insects and suck out their body fluids.
Photographed by: Mark Smith. Identified to order by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Huntington Woods, Michigan, USA. Date: 2 July, 2013.
Western Corsair Bug
Western Corsair Bug, Rasahus thoracicus, subfamily Peiratinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: LC. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: north of San Francisco, California, USA. Date: 28 August, 2016.
Corsair Assassin Bug
Corsair Assassin Bug, Rasahus hamatus, subfamily Peiratinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Heather Hazlett. Identified to order by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: central Texas, USA. Date: 2 June, 2017.
Reduviid
Blood-Sucking Conenose, a species in the Triatoma genus, subfamily Triatominae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed and identified to order by: Robert Lewis. Identified to genus by Nhi Pham Thi, Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology. Location: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Date: 17 March, 2017. Nhi notes that all members of the subfamily Triatominae “are blood-sucking insects that can transmit serious diseases.”
Sundew Assassin Bug
Sundew Assassin Bug, also known as a Pale Green Assassin Bug (although they’re not always pale green), Zelus luridus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This species secretes a sticky substance, called sundew, that helps their front legs grab onto prey. (Most other assassin bugs don’t secrete a sticky substance.)
Photographed by: Marian Williams. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Waco, Carroll County, Georgia, USA. Date: 27 August, 2017. Marian says, “I’m sure I’ve seen similar bugs before but never looked so close. I found him/her to be very interesting.”
Sundew Assassin Bug
Sundew Assassin Bug, also known as a Pale Green Assassin Bug, Zelus luridus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Marian Williams. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org.
□ A key characteristic of the Sundew Assassin Bug is the pair of thorn-like projections on the thorax, as shown here.
Location: near Waco, Carroll County, Georgia, USA. Date: 27 August, 2017.
Assassin Bug (genus Rhynocoris)
Assassin Bug, in the genus Rhynocoris, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Santhosh Kumar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: India. Date: 3 December, 2017. Santhosh says, “I found it on my neck.”
Spiny Assassin Bug (Sinea)
Spiny Assassin Bug, nymph, genus Sinea, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Now that is one prickly insect! Adult Spiny Assassin Bugs still have spines, but they are much less pronounced than they are on the nymphs (like this one).
Photographed by: Heather Bond. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tucker, Georgia, USA. Date: 30 June, 2017. Heather says, “It was found in my kitchen on the counter.”
Spiny Assassin Bug (Sinea)
Spiny Assassin Bug, nymph, genus Sinea, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ In this view of the previous insect, its long and spear-like mouthparts are clearly visible.
Photographed by: Heather Bond. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tucker, Georgia, USA. Date: 30 June, 2017.
Ringed Assassin Bug (Pselliopus cinctus)
Ringed Assassin Bug, Pselliopus cinctus, subfamily Harpactorinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The striping and soft coloration is distinctive. This bug preys on Buffalo Treehoppers.
Photographed by: Regina Rainey. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: southern Maryland, USA. Date: 25 September, 2017. Regina went outside with her dog, and found this pretty little bug on her hair.
Masked Hunter (Reduvius personatus)
Masked Hunter, nymph, Reduvius personatus, subfamily Reduviinae, family Reduviidae (the assassin bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ According to Dr. Duke Elsner, “The nymphs are coated with sticky hairs, and they get covered with whatever small particulate material they come in contact with. The adults are shining deep-brown to black, and do not have the sticky hairs.” To see the adults, click here. Photographed by: Denise Rulason. Identified by: entomologist Duke Elsner. Thank you, Dr. Elsner! Location: Mayville, Michigan, USA. Date: 18 September, 2017. Denise says, “It was “VERY small. Possibly (the size of the) eraser on a pencil for circumference with legs.”
Add your photo here!

Pentatomidae (the stink bugs)

green stink bug
Green Stink Bug, nymph (immature), Acrosternum hilare, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is a nymph (immature). As an adult, this stink bug is bright green, which is where it gets its descriptive if unimaginative common name of Green Stink Bug.
Photographed by: Patti Donnellan. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lorain County, northeastern Ohio, USA. Date: 8 September, 2016. Patti found it along a crushed limestone trail next to a wetland.
green stink bug
Green Stink Bug, nymph (immature), Acrosternum hilare, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Patti Donnellan. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lorain County, northeastern Ohio, USA. Date: 8 September, 2016. Patti says, “I didn’t know the green stinkers lived this far north. I have seen them when I lived in Alabama, but not up here.”
Green stink bug
Green Stink Bug, nymph (immature), Chinavia halaris, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Yes, there are several stink bugs that share the same common name of Green Stink Bug, but they are actually separate species.
Photographed by: Christine Howells. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Beckley, West Virginia. Date: 22 August, 2017.
green stink bug
Green Stink Bug, nymph (immature), Acrosternum hilare, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Dave Delman, M.D. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Jericho, New York, USA. Date: 29 October, 2017.
Southern Stink Bug (<i>Nezara viridula</i>)
Southern Stink Bug, nymph (immature), Nezara viridula, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Insects go through stages as they grow, and the stages are called instars. This appears to be a fourth instar nymph, so it only needs to molt twice more before becoming an adult. The adult is a shamrock green.
Photographed and identified by: Damian Duron. Location: Watsonville, California, USA. Date: 19 October, 2017. Damian says, “I am afraid these guys are not too good for my garden. (They) infested my green beans this year.” KnowYourInsects.org replies, “We are gardeners, soo, so we share your pain!”
Agonoscelis nubilis
Stink Bug, Agonoscelis nubilis, family Pentatomatidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This stink bug blends in very well with the background, but if you look closely, you can see how beautiful it actually is.
Photographed by: Bapi Debnath. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mohanpur,Tripura,India. Date: 22 February, 2017.
Green stink bug
Green Shield Bug, also known as Green Stink Bug, Palomena prasina, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ It has very similar features to the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (shown below), including the narrow brown and white “trim” around the outside.
Photographed by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oxford, England, UK. Date: 23 August, 2016. Jean-Louis says, “Found in our garden on a piece of wood.”
Bishop's Mitre Shield Bug (Aelia acuminata)
Bishop’s Mitre Shield Bug, Aelia acuminata, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oxford, England, UK. Date: 16 September, 2017.
Add your photo here!
brown marmorated stink bug
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Zoom in on this one — amazing detail in this excellent photo!
Photographed and identified by: Charlie Winstead. Location: Warrick County, Indiana, USA. Date: Late autumn, 2014. Charlie says this stink bug “settled in on the front window screen — most likely his (or her) final resting place for the coming winter season. At 50°F, he was motionless — allowing me to make several exposures with different focus points to combine (stacked) for this image.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “That is one gorgeous photo, Charlie!”
brown marmorated stink bug
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Brown marmorated stink bugs are native to Asia. In the mid-1990s, they were mistakenly introduced to the United States, where they are becoming major agricultural pests.
Photographed by: Cindy Core. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dearborn, Michigan, USA. Date: 1 August, 2015.
brown marmorated stink bug
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Michigan State University is tracking sightings of this bug in Michigan (to report a sighting to MSU, click here.)
Photographed by: Maria Slowinski. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Union Pier, Michigan, USA. Date: 15 October, 2016. Maria says, “We have a bit of a family of them flying around our cottage.”
brown marmorated stink bug
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, nymph (immature), Halyomorpha halys, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The striped antennae and legs, along with the dark and light edge around the abdomen, are characteristic features of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs. Photographed by: Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pasadena, Maryland, USA. Date: 9 September, 2017.
brown marmorated stink bug
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ These images show the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug from the top and from the bottom.
Photographed by: Jodi H. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Date: 7 November, 2017. Jodi says, “I have found 2 of these bugs dead in my house.”
brown marmorated stink bug
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ And here is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug from Paris — they do get around!
Photographed by: François Robin-Champigneul. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Paris, France. Date: 7 December, 2017. François says, “I’m not sure where it came from, possibly from my window but it could come also, I think, from a parcel I received from the USA or China, I’m not sure.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “You could well be correct about it coming from elsewhere, François. Insects do indeed travel by air, ship, automobile, and just about any other kind of human transportation.”
brown marmorated stink bug
Stink Bug, nymph (immature), possibly Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Gosal Das. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Agartala, Tripura, India. Date: 3 April, 2017.
Forest bug (Pentatoma rufipes)
Forest Bug, Pentatoma rufipes, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The spot in the middle of its back may be colored cream to red. Actually, the spot is at the rear tip of the scutellum, which is the triangular-shaped part of the thorax.
Photographed by: Grant Spurr. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Cheshire County in northwest England, UK. Date: 18 September, 2017. Grant says, “It was spotted in the garden in Cheshire. The spot on its back and around the edges of the body are red.”
Two-spotted stink bug
Two-Spotted Stink Bug, Perillus bioculatus, family Pentatomatidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is the “tan form” of this pretty little stink bug. It also comes in a red form, so everything that is tan/ivory in this photo is red. Two-Spotted Stink Bugs are beneficial insects that prey on garden pests.
Photographed by: Sandy Anderson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Unknown. Date: 20 June, 2017. Sandy says, “Thank you so much for identifying this! Our family enjoys looking at and identifying bugs!”
Two-spotted stink bug
Two-Spotted Stink Bug, Perillus bioculatus, family Pentatomatidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ If you didn’t know better, you might think someone painted on this art-deco pattern!
Photographed by: Angela Johnson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Cascade, Montana, USA. Date: December, 2017. Angela says, “Found this beetle on a window in our house. In December!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “While it is often assumed to be a beetle, it is actually a stink bug, which is in an entirely different insect order. Such a cool bug!”
Stink bug nymph
Stink Bug, nymph, possibly a Two-Spotted Stink Bug, Perillus bioculatus, family Pentatomatidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is a nymph of one of the stink bugs, but even after checking with four stink bug experts, we cannot be sure of the species. Because it was found on potato plants, however, one of the experts said it was likely a Two-Spotted Stink Bug, which prey on Potato Beetles.
Photographed by: Jenny Hotz. Identification assistance provided by: entomologist Robert Koch of the University of Minnesota, and Tom Coudron of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, who also consulted two other stink bug experts. Thank you all for your help! Location: Unknown. Date: 26 July, 2017. Jenny says, “Found this bug in our potato field in Minnesota.... I’ve never seen anything like it before! ... P.S. We’ve named it the stormtrooper bug :)”
stink bug eggs
Eggs, possibly eggs of the Shield Bug, Troilus luridus, family Pentatomidae (the stink bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed and identified by: Bruna Oliveira. Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA. Date: 29 June, 2016. Bruna wondered if Troilus luridus had been reported in Michigan, but a check with two Michigan State University entomologists had no reports of it as of summer 2016.
Add your photo here!
Add your photo here!

Acanthosomatidae (the shield bugs)
Scutelleridae (the metallic shield bugs or jewel bugs)


Birch shield bug
Birch Shield Bug, fifth instar nymph (the last stage of an immature bug before becoming an adult), Elasmostethus interstinctus, family Acanthosomatidae (the shield bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ At one time, this family was classified as a subfamily (Acanthosomatinae) of the family Pentatomatidae.
Photographed by: Jostein Håvard Kolnes. Identified by: Dr. Leslie Mertz. Location: Stavanger-area, Norway. Date: July, 2012.
Lychee shield bug
Lychee Shield Bug, Chrysocoris stollii, family Scutelleridae (the metallic shield bugs or jewel bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ It also goes by the common name of Green Jewel Bug.
Photographed by: Ajay Antony. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamilnadu, India. Date: 6 May, 2017.
Lychee shield bug
Lychee Shield Bug, Chrysocoris stollii, family Scutelleridae (the metallic shield bugs or jewel bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The underside is just as pretty as the top side!
Photographed by: Ajay Antony. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamil Nadu, India. Date: 6 May, 2017.

Belostomatidae (the giant water bugs)

Giant water bug
Giant Water Bug, family Belostomatidae (the giant water bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Giant water bugs are called giant because they are BIG! And yes, that ruler shows this Giant Water Bug is 2.5 inches long (that’s 6.25 cm). Quite an impressive beast!
Photographed by: Nick Dettorre. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Everett, Washington, USA. Date: 29 August, 2017. Nick says, “My coworkers and I believe the water bug was a stowaway on one of several shipments we received from Florida.”
Giant water bug
Giant Water Bug, family Belostomatidae (the giant water bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Those beefy front legs look fearsome, but it is actually their “beak,” called a rostrum, that can inflict a deadly chomp to prey ... or a painful bite to a person’s toe. That explains why giant water bugs are sometimes called “toe-biters.”
Photographed by: Jimmy Dallas. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Panama City Beach, Florida, USA. Date: 15 September, 2016.
Giant water bug
Giant Water Bug, family Belostomatidae (the giant water bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Often, Giant Water Bugs will rest on land with their front legs folded and their “elbows” splayed out (just like this one is doing). Interesting fact: A Giant Water Bug father will care for his young by carrying the eggs on his back — often dozens of them — until they hatch.
Photographed by: Terri Nelson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mississippi, USA. Date: 26 July, 2017.

Corixidae (the water boatmen)
Gerridae (the water striders)
Nepidae (the water scorpions)


Water boatman
Water Boatman, family Corixidae (the water boatmen), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Adult Water Boatmen have large and wide hind legs that look and work like paddles to propel them through the water. This particular specimen is a larva, so it still has some growing to do.
Photographed by: Frank O’Regan. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Glatane County, Cork, Ireland. Date: 15 September, 2016.
Water strider
Water Strider, family Gerridae (the water striders), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Water Striders skate along the surface of the water, which is why they are sometimes called pond skaters. They can also tap down with their legs on the water surface to make ripples, and scientists believe they use these ripples to communicate with one another. Note: This insect holds its foremost pair of legs out front, so they look almost like antennae.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker. Location: Near Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 4 September, 2017. Bryan provided the list of common names this insect goes by: “Water Skater; Pond Skater; Water Skipper; Skimmer; Water Strider; and Jesus bug.” He adds that it took him a minute to get the Jesus bug reference — after all, this insect does walk on water!
Water scorpion
Water Scorpion, genus Ranatra, family Nepidae (the water scorpions), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This insect was about 3 inches long, and was in a river water sample collected by Mark Stephens for one one of the amazing activities in of his excellent Project F.I.S.H. programs at Michigan State University.
Photographed by: Leslie Mertz. Identified by: Mark Stephens. Location: River near Lansing, Michigan, USA. Date: 7 March, 2017.

Lygaeidae (the milkweed bugs and seed bugs)
Rhyparochromidae (the dirt-colored seed bugs)


Milkweed bugs (<i>Oncopeltus fasciatus</i>)
Milkweed Bugs, nymphs (immatures), Oncopeltus fasciatus, family Lycaeidae, (the milkweed bugs and seed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ These are immature milkweed bugs, or milkweed bug nymphs. The bright orange-red color helps potential predators to know that they taste bad, and therefore helps to protect them from being eaten.
Photographed by: Susan Barron. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Frenchtown, New Jersey, USA. Date: 18 September 2016.Susan found these nymphs on butterfly weed, which is a kind of milkweed plant with beautiful orange flowers.
Add your photo here!
Long-Necked Seed Bug (<i>Myodocha serripes</i>)
Long-Necked Seed Bug, Myodocha serripes, family Rhyparochromidae, (the dirt-colored seed bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ That is one long neck!
Photographed by: Alex Pendjurin. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Washington, USA. Date: 18 May, 2017.

Rhopalidae (the scentless plant bugs)

Scentless seed bug
Scentless Seed Bug, possibly Arhyssus scutatus, family Rhopalidae, (the scentless plant bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Monica Isaza. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Utah, USA. Date: 29 June, 2016. Monica says, “I am not sure if they fly or just jump, (but) when I am in the garage or close to where they are, I always get a few on myself.”
Box elder bug
Box Elder Bug, Boisea trivittata, family Rhopalidae, (the scentless plant bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ Check out that handsome red and black pattern! The box elder bug is not tasty to predators, and the red color helps to let predators know that they should find a meal elsewhere. A side note: When the weather turns cold, groups of box elder bugs will congregate someplace warm, occasionally in houses.
Photographed by: Sarah Zolynsky. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Canton, Michigan, USA. Date: 6 October, 2016.
Box Elder Bugs, nymphs, (<i>Boisea trivittata</i>)
Box Elder Bugs, nymphs (immatures), Boisea trivittata, family Rhopalidae, (the scentless plant bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The original photo shows dozens and dozens of these insects; we zoomed in on a few of them here. They closely resemble Large Milkweed Bug nymphs.
Photographed by and identified as nymphs by: Craig Olson. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. Date: 18 September 2016. Craig says, “Never seen them before. Wondering if it is a nymph stage of something.” KnowYourInsects replies, “Craig are correct! They are nymphs!”
Box elder bug
Box Elder Bug, Boisea trivittata, family Rhopalidae, (the scentless plant bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ When the weather turns cold, groups of box elder bugs will congregate someplace warm, occasionally in houses.
Photographed by: Ron Wilder. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Liverpool, New York, USA. Date: 8 November, 2016. Ron says, “Over 100 of them were on the siding of my house and the garage door, like they were basking in the bright, warm sun of that day.”
Box elder bug
Box Elder Bug, Boisea trivittata, family Rhopalidae, (the scentless plant bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ This is the underside of the previous photo—still red and black, but a different pattern.
Photographed by: Ron Wilder. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Liverpool, New York, USA. Date: 8 November, 2016.
Add your photo here!

Miridae (the plant bugs, leaf bugs, and grass bugs)

Miridae, species unknown
Plant Bug, family Miridae, (the plant bugs, leaf bugs, and grass bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
□ The exact species of this plant bug is unknown. If you can identify this bug, which was photographed in Costa Rica, let us know!
Photographed by: Todd Hawley. Identified to family by: Lee P. Guillebeau, an entomologist at the University of Georgia (thank you, Lee!). Location: Costa Rica. Date: December 2015.
Adelphocoris lineolatus
Alfalfa Plant Bug, Adelphocoris lineolatus, family Miridae (the plant bugs, leaf bugs, and grass bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Jostein Håvard Kolnes. Identified by: Dr. Bernard S. Nau. Location: Stavanger-area, Norway. Date: 13 August, 2012.
Leptopterna dolabrata
Grass Bug (also known as a Meadow Plant Bug), Leptopterna dolabrata, fifth instar nymph, family Miridae (the plant bugs, leaf bugs, and grass bugs), suborder Heteroptera.
Photographed by: Jostein Håvard Kolnes. Identified by: Dr. Bernard S. Nau. Location: Stavanger-area, Norway. Date: 31 July, 2011.

Cicadidae (the cicadas)

Bush Cicada
Bush Cicada, Neotibicen dorsatus, family Cicadidae (the cicadas), suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
Photographed and identified to order by: Nicole Burgoz. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Pampa, Gray County, Texas, USA. Date: 26 August, 2015.
Annual Cicada
Annual Cicada, Tibicen linnei, family Cicadidae (the cicadas), suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
Photographed and identified by: Matthew Woods. Location: Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 8 September, 2013.
Annual Cicada
Annual Cicada, Tibicen linnei, family Cicadidae (the cicadas), suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
Photographed and identified by: Matthew Woods. Location: Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 8 September, 2013.
Cicada emerging
Annual Cicada, Tibicen linnei, family Cicadidae (the cicadas), suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ This and the next three photos show the metamorphosis. Here it is emerging from the larva casing. The empty casing, called the exuviae, is left behind.
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Saginaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 26 July, 2016.
Cicada newly emerged
Annual Cicada, Tibicen linnei, family Cicadidae (the cicadas), suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ The cicada is now fully emerged from the larval casing (exuviae).
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Saginaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 26 July, 2016.
Cicada emerged
Annual Cicada, Tibicen linnei, family Cicadidae (the cicadas), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ The cicada is drying, its wings now unfurled and expanded.
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Saginaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 26 July, 2016.
Cicada emerged
Annual Cicada, Tibicen linnei, family Cicadidae (the cicadas), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ Within a few hours of its emergence from the larva, this cicada is now ready to engage in its adult life.
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Saginaw County, Michigan, USA. Date: 26 July, 2016.
Annual Cicada
Annual Cicada, Tibicen linnei, family Cicadidae (the cicadas), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
Photographed and identified by: Norine Nichols. Location: Sterling Heights, Michigan, USA. Date: 18 September, 2016. Norine says, “I never realized how colorful there were. You hear them, but rarely see them.” She adds, “I just saved this guy from a container with water in it. He is drying out on my deck.” Way to go, Norine!
Add your photo here!

Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers)

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted Lanternfly, 4th instar nymph (immature stage), Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ If you are in the United States or Canada, be on the lookout for this insect, which is a recent invader of Pennsylvania. If you see one, report it to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture here.
Photographed by: Chris Prinzivalli. Identified by: Dr. Mary Barbercheck and Dr. Julie Urban at Penn State. Location: Boyertown, Pike Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 22 July, 2017.
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted Lanternfly, 4th instar nymph (immature stage), Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ If you are in the United States or Canada, report sightings of this grape pest insect to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture here.
Photographed by: Chris Prinzivalli. Identified by: Dr. Mary Barbercheck and Dr. Julie Urban at Penn State. Location: Boyertown, Pike Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 22 July, 2017.
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted Lanternfly, 4th instar nymph (immature stage), Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ If you are in the United States or Canada, report sightings of this grape pest insect to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture here.
Photographed by: Chris Prinzivalli. Identified by: Dr. Mary Barbercheck and Dr. Julie Urban at Penn State. Location: Boyertown, Pike Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 22 July, 2017.
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted Lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ This adult Spotted Lanternfly looks much different than it does when it is younger (see previous photos). Whether it is an adult or numph, if you are in the United States or Canada, report sightings of this grape pest insect to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture here.
Photographed by: Dana Weddle. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Verified by: Dr. Julie Urban at Penn State. Location: Maple Grove Raceway, Mohnton, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 24 September, 2017.
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted Lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ A beautiful insect, the Spotted Lanternfly is a pest of cultivated grapes, apples, other fruits, and hardwood trees. A native of China, India and Vietnam, it was first discovered in the United States in 2014. If you are in the United States or Canada, report sightings of this insect to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture here.
Photographed by: Dana Weddle. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Verified by: Dr. Julie Urban at Penn State. Location: Maple Grove Raceway, Mohnton, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 24 September, 2017.
Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula)
Spotted Lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, family Fulgoridae (the fulgorid planthoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ The photographer of this shot notes that it “has a bright red-and-white underwing pattern when it flies.” As noted in other postings, if you are in the United States or Canada, report sightings of this insect to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture here.
Photographed by: Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Exeter Township, outside of Reading, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 12 September, 2017. Kelly says, “These are all over my parking lot at work today.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Yikes!”

Membracidae (the treehoppers and thorn bugs)
Cercopidae (the spittlebugs and froghoppers)

Buffalo Leafhopper
Buffalo Treehopper, nymph (immature), Stictocephala bisonia, family Membracidae (the treehoppers and thorn bugs), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ That humped back is indeed reminiscent of a buffalo! And notice that the scientific species name even has “bison” in it.
Photographed and identified by: Anonymous. Location: Adrian, Michigan, USA. Date: July, 2014.
Two-lined spittlebug (Prosapia bicincta)
Prosapia bicincta, family Cercopidae, (the spittlebugs and froghoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ This one has red stripes on its forewings, but in some individuals the stripes are orange — sometimes almost yellow.
Photographed by: Jennifer Wiggins. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Memphis, Tennessee, USA. Date: 11 July, 2017. Jennifer says, “Found it in my cat’s water bowl... Maybe 3/4 inch? Beautiful insect!”
Meadow spittlebug (<i>Philaenus spumarius</i>)
Meadow Spittlebug, Philaenus spumarius, family Cercopidae, (the spittlebugs and froghoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
Identified and photographed by: Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Location: Michigan, USA. Date: 10 August, 2012. KnowYourInsects.org says, “Another beautiful close-up by Kelly!”

Cicadellidae (the leafhoppers)

Candy-Striped Leafhopper
Candy-Striped Leafhopper, also known as a Red-Banded Leafhopper, Graphocephala coccinea, family Cicadellidae (the leafhoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ With this beautiful leafhopper has its wings outstretched, you can see its vibrant abdomen.
Photographed by: Donna Croaker Hall. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rouge Park, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 October, 2014.
Candy-Striped Leafhopper
Candy-Striped Leafhopper, also known as a Red-Banded Leafhopper, Graphocephala coccinea, family Cicadellidae (the leafhoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ This photo illustrates the tiny size of this leafhopper — that’s the photographer’s pinky finger.
Photographed by: Donna Croaker Hall. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rouge Park, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 October, 2014.
Froghopper
Froghopper, superfamily Cicadoidea (the hoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ This is one of the hoppers in the big superfamily Cicadoidea. It appears to be a froghopper, but that can only be definitively determined with a bit closer view than permitted in the photo — it can be difficult to get a good shot of a small insect!
Photographed by: Tracey Finkbeiner. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: East Providence, Rhode Island, Michigan, USA. Date: 5 November, 2017. Tracey provided this description: “It looks like a miniature cicada. It has membranous wings and is wedge-shaped. They don’t seem to fly, just jump. They are smaller than the tip of a ball-point pen.” Knowyourinsects.org says, “Great description, Tracey! And yes, they are not only related to cicadas, but they do jump or hop!”

Flatidae (the flatid leafhoppers)
Issidae (the issid planthoppers)

Planthopper nymph
Northern Flatid Planthopper, Flatormenis proxima, family Flatidae (the flatid planthoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ The big eyes, “snub-nosed” face make planthoppers rather adorable little creatures.
Photographed by: Elizabeth Boyle. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Milford, New Jersey, USA. Date: 23 August, 2017. Elizabeth says, “I spotted this lovely creature on the railing of my steps.... The color is beautiful!”
Add your photo here! Planthopper nymph
Planthopper, nymph (immature), likely genus Issus, family Issidae (the issid planthoppers), Suborder Auchenorrhyncha.
□ The tufts extending from the rear end are actually waxy filaments that the planthoppers are able to spout. The filaments can become quite large and bushy, and help to hide the insect from predators.
Photographed by: Wim Ridder. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kockengen, the Netherlands. Date: 27 May, 2015. Wim says, “This small insect (3 mm) jumped on my book, in my garden, at 15.44 h. People of the Dutch organisation Waarneming.nl wrote me that it probably is a specimen (nymph) of Auchenorrhyncha. Photos on your site show me that they may be right.”

Aphidae (the aphids)

Aphids
Aphids, family Aphididae, Suborder Sternorrhyncha.
Photographed by: Milosh Rankovic. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ontario, Canada. Date: 12 October, 2016. Says Milosh, “They are gathering in the corner of the outside wall and garden door. Looks to me, they are looking for some warmer place.... Temperatures are getting colder — about 5C — during the night.”
Aphids
Aphids, family Aphididae, Suborder Sternorrhyncha.
□ Aphids have an interesting relationship with ants. Aphids suck up lots of sweet plant juices and their waste products are also sweet. In fact, their waste products are called honeydew! Ants love sweet things and will congregate among the aphids so they can eat up the aphids’ honeydew.
Photographed by: Milosh Rankovic. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ontario, Canada. Date: 12 October, 2016.
Woolly Aphids
Woolly Aphids, subfamily Eriosomatinae, family Aphididae, Order Hemiptera (the true bugs).
□ Woolly Aphids are sometimes called Fairyflies or Angelflies, and it’s easy to see why with that cottony white covering! Actually, the “cotton” is a collection of wax filaments.
Photographed by: Janvier Petto. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: northeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 19 July, 2017. Janvier says, “They were all over hostas and no more than 1/2" long (if that).”

Coccidae

Calico scale insect
Calico Scale Insect, Eulecanium cerasorum, family Coccidae, Suborder Sternorrhyncha.
Photographed by: Brian Carpenter. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Washington, USA. Date: 20 May, 2017. Brian says, “My family member in Washington state has found these all over her walnut tree.”
Add your photo here! Add your photo here!


HomeWho We Are List of Orders References Contact Us

Unless noted otherwise, photographs on this website are the property of the photographers and may not be reused without written permission from the photographers. To obtain permission, email the photographers here. High-resolution versions of the photographs are available.

Photos at the top of this website are (from left to right): potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) — photo credit: Scott Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture; ebony jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata)— photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; sweat bee (Agapostemon splendens) — photo credit: Natalie Allen and Stephanie Kolski, U.S. Geological Survey; preying mantis, monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), hellgrammite (aka toe biter) larva and eyed click beetle (Alaus oculatus) — photo credit: Leslie Mertz; Halloween pennant (Celithemis eponina) — photo credit: Kay Meng, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Reproduction of material from any GoExploreMichigan Media webpages without written permission is strictly prohibited.