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*** Note: KnowYourInsects.org does its best to include correct identifications of insect photos. It’s always possible that we made a mistake, however, so if you see a misidentification, please contact us and we will correct it. Thanks!

Order Coleoptera: the beetles — Examples

Families represented below:
Anthicidae (the antlike flower beetles)Attelabidae (the leaf-rolling weevils)Brentidae (the primitive weevils)Buprestidae (the metallic wood-boring beetles)Cantharidae (the soldier beetles)Carabidae (the ground beetles)Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles)Cleridae (the checkered beetles)Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles)Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles)Cucujidae (the flat-bark beetlesCurculionidae (the weevils)Dermestidae (the dermestid or skin beetles)Dytiscidae (the predaceous diving beetles)Elateridae (the click beetles)Hydrophilidae (the water scavenger beetles)Lampyridae (the fireflies or lightningbugs)Lucanidae (the stag beetles)Lycidae (the net-winged beetles)Lymexylidae (the ship timber beetles)Meloidae (the blister beetles)Melyridae (the soft-winged flower beetles)Mordellidae (the pintail beetles or tumbling flower beetles)Nitidulidae (the sap beetles)Oedemeridae (the false blister beetles)Passalidae, the bessbugs or betsy beetles)Phengodidae, the glowworm beetlesScarabaeidae (the scarab beetles)Silphidae (the carrion beetles)Silvanidae (the flat bark or silvanid beetles)Staphylinidae (the rove beetles)Tenebrionidae (the darkling beetles)Zopheridae (the ironclad beetles and the cylindrical bark beetles)

Chrysomelidae, the leaf beetles

Spotted Cucumber Beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata)
Spotted Cucumber Beetle Diabrotica undecimpunctata, subfamily Galerucinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ True to its name of Spotted Cucumber Beetle, this attractive beetle does love cucumbers, but it will also eat other crops, including melons and pumpkins. The adults dine on leaves, vines, and fruit.
Photographed by: Quy Thai. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sterling Heights, Macomb County, Michigan, USA. Date: 31 August, 2014.
Spotted Cucumber Beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata)
Spotted Cucumber Beetle, Diabrotica undecimpunctata, subfamily Galerucinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ The larva of the Spotted Cucumber Beetle is sometimes called a Southern Corn Rootworm because it bores into the stems of corn plants, usually right at ground level or a bit above, and this can kill the plant. More information about this species is available here.
Photographed by: Dave Delman, M.D. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, New York, USA. Date: 28 October, 2017.
Spotted Cucumber Beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata)
Spotted Cucumber Beetle, Diabrotica undecimpunctata, subfamily Galerucinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Some Spotted Cucumber Beetles have a yellowish-green abdomen, as can be seen in this photo that shows the abdomen peeking out beyond the forewings (elytra). Others have a more yellowish-orange abdomen. Those with the yellowish-green abdomen fall into the subspecies Diabrotica undecimpunctata undecimpunctata; and the yellowish-orange ones in the subspecies Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi.
Photographed and identified by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: city of San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 27 November, 2017.
Thomas says, “I found this one crawling on our car, a Nissan Leaf. Did it really know it was a Leaf?”
Elm Leaf Beetle (Xanthogaleruca luteola)
Elm Leaf Beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola, subfamily Galerucinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles),
□ The Elm Leaf Beetle may be greenish in color (as shown here) or yellow. It is a pest species on elm trees — the larvae of this beetle are leaf skeletonizers, which means that they eat the green parts of leaves, so only the veins are left behind. For more information and to see the yellow form of the Elm Leaf Beetle, click here.
Photographed and identified to order by: Robert Moelder. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Cashmere, Washington, USA. Date: 11 April, 2019.
Flea Beetles (subfamily Galerucinae)
Flea Beetles, subfamily Galerucinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles),
□ Flea Beetles get their name from their amazing jumping ability, similar to that of Fleas. Flea Beetles, however, are not related to Fleas. Fleas fall under a completely separate insect order, the Siphonaptera. Read about fleas here.
Photographed and identified by: Abang Albert Fomumbod, who is a Ph.D. student working on resistance of okra (the plant shown here) to aphids. Location: Cameroon (specifically AVRDC/IITA station, Nkolbisson, Yaounde Cameroon). Date: September 2014.
Flea Beetles (subfamily Galerucinae)
Flea Beetles, subfamily Galerucinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Close-up of the flea beetles. Different species of Flea Beetles often favor specific plants. Those in this photo are dining on okra leaves.
Photographed and identified by: Abang Albert Fomumbod. Location: Cameroon (specifically AVRDC/IITA station, Nkolbisson, Yaounde Cameroon). Date: September 2014.
Dogbane Beetle (Chrysochus auratus)
Dogbane Beetle, Chrysochus auratus, subfamily Eumolpinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Look at that color! Not surprisingly, the Dogbane Beetle eats the plant known as Common Dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum) — the larvae (grubs) munch on the roots, and the adult beetles nibble at the leaves.
Photographed and identified by: Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Location: northern Ohio, USA. Date: 6 July, 2016.
Colapsis Beetle (Colapsis spp.)
Colapsis Beetle in the genus Colapsis, subfamily Eumolpinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Several species in this genus look nearly identical. One is known by the scientific name of Colaspis pseudofavosa, which is sometimes called Colaspis floridana as it is found in Florida where this photo was taken. Colaspis pseudofavosa feeds on blueberries and pecans, as well as other things, such as the southern wax myrtle/bayberry tree, according to the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
Photographed by: Marv Goldberg. Location: Tamarac, Florida, USA. Date: 23 April, 2019.
Calligrapha beetle (Calligrapha spp.)
Calligrapha Beetle in the genus Calligrapha, subfamily Chrysomelinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Calligrapha is a good name for these beetles, because the markings look like calligraphy. Most species of Calligrapha Beetles live in Central America and South America, but some (like this one) extend north into the United States.
Photographed by; Julie Brown. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Haxtun, Colorado, USA. Date: 18 July, 2017.
Mint Beetle (Chrysolina herbacea)
Mint Beetle, possibly Chrysolina herbacea, subfamily Chrysomelinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ The coloring of this species, several of which are shown on a mint plant, looks different depending on the light and angle of view. They appear to be Mint Beetles, even though this species is usually found in central Asia and Europe, rather than in India where this photo was taken.
Photographed by: Syed Gazanfar. Identified by: entomologist Fredric Vencl of Stony Brook University and the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution. Thank you, Dr. Vencl! Location: Kashmir, India. Date: 24 April, 2018.
Syed says, “We have abundance of wild mint growing here on the roadsides. I’ve seen this beetle since spring, mating on almost all the plants.”
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Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle (Labidomera clivicollis)
Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle, Labidomera clivicollis, subfamily Chrysomelinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ The color and pattern of the Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle is highly variable. Some are red, some orange, and some are ivory-colored. Black spotting is always present, but the spots may be much more or less extensive in some individuals.
Photographed by: Bea Cuthbertson. Identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: on the border between Hillsdale and Lenawee counties, Michigan, USA. Date: 8 September, 2015.
Bea says, “It was roughly 3/8"–1/2" total.”
Bloody-Nosed Beetle (Timarcha tenebricosa)
Bloody-Nosed Beetle, also known as a Blood-Spewing Beetle, Timarcha tenebricosa, subfamily Chrysomelinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Find out how this beetle got its name by reading the photographer’s comment below. Also, see another view of this beetle in the next photo.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: June, 2018.
Bryan says, “It’s said that when it’s disturbed, it oozes a red liquid from its front end, but not what I’ve seen so far!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “The liquid is indeed insect blood, which is called hemolymph. The hemolymph is distasteful to predators, so oozing a droplet is a good defensive maneuver.”
Bloody-Nosed Beetle (Timarcha tenebricosa)
Bloody-Nosed Beetle, also known as a Blood-Spewing Beetle, Timarcha tenebricosa, subfamily Chrysomelinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Another nice view of the Bloody-Nosed Beetle, this one a top view.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 29 April, 2018.
Bryan says “this cute little beetle” was about 10–12mm in length.
Colorado Potato Beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata)
Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, subfamily Chrysomelinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ The Colorado Potato Beetle is a major pest of potato plants, and will also attack tomato and pepper plants.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 28 May, 2012.
False Potato Beetle (Leptinotarsa juncta)
False Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa juncta, subfamily Chrysomelinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ The False Potato Beetle is not an agricultural pest. Rather, it eats plants usually considered weeds, such as horsenettle and ground cherry.
Photographed by: Elizabeth Boyle. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Milford, New Jersey, USA. Date: 11 June, 2017.
False Potato Beetle(Leptinotarsa juncta)
False Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa juncta, subfamily Chrysomelinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ The brown strip down the middle of the back helps distinguish the False Potato Beetle from the Colorado Potato Beetle.
Photographed and identified to order by: Bill Schwartz. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Gettysburg, PA, USA. Date: 20 August, 2014.
Clavate Tortoise Beetle (Plagiometriona clavata)
Clavate Tortoise Beetle, Plagiometriona clavata, subfamily Cassidinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Tortoise Beetles, like the Clavate Tortoise Beetle shown here, have a wide turtle-like upper shell, the edges of which are transparent.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 12 June, 2012.
Clavate Tortoise Beetle (Plagiometriona clavata)
Clavate Tortoise Beetle, Plagiometriona clavata, subfamily Cassidinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 12 June, 2012.
Tortoise Beetle (Aspidimorpha spp.)
Tortoise Beetle in the genus Aspidimorpha, possibly Aspidimorpha sanctaecrucis, subfamily Cassidinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
Photographed by Spoorthi Sv. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Shivamogga (Shimoga), Karnataka state, southwest India. Date: 7 March, 2018.
Tortoise Beetle pupa (subfamily Cassidinae)
Tortoise Beetle, pupa, subfamily Cassidinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ Entomologist Poorani Janakiraman of the National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources in Bangalore, India, identified this as a pupa of one of the beetles in the Chrysomelidae, most likely a pupa of a tortoise beetle.
Photographed by: Arkopal Gupta. Identified by: Poorani Janakiraman. Thank you, Dr. Janakiraman! Location: West Bengal, India. Date: 25 February, 2018.
Leaf Beetle (Cryptocephalus fulgaratus)
Leaf Beetle (no other common name), Cryptocephalus fulgaratus, subfamily Cryptocephalinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ According to entomologist Robert Barney (who identified this beetle), it is not a common species.
Photographed by Seif Naqvi. Identified by: Robert J. Barney, Ph.D., professor emeritus at West Virginia State University. Thank you, Dr. Barney! Location: Lexington, Kentucky, USA. Date: 8 September, 2017.
Seif’s mother Kathleen says, “KY. I found this bug in a branch in my peach tree.”
Mimosestes Seed Beetle (Mimosestes amicus)
Mimosestes Seed Beetle, Mimosestes amicus, subfamily Cryptocephalinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ A careful look will reveal a rosy hue in about the middle of the gray wings. Female Mimosestes Seed Beetles lay their eggs in plants in the genus Parkinsonia, which includes plants known as Foothills Palo Verde, Blue Palo Verde, and in Velvet Mesquite.
Photographed by: Betty-Lou Archibald. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Apache Junction, Arizona, USA. Date: 7 November, 2017.
Betty-Lou describes this one as being able to hop or jump, and also fly.
Scarlet Lily Leaf Beetle (Lilioceris lilii)
Scarlet Lily Leaf Beetle, Lilioceris lilii, subfamily Criocerinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ According to Bugguide.net, this is a Eurasian species that first came to Montreal, Canada, in the 1940s and has spread into the United States. It is believed that it spread via nursery-bought lilies, but now it has also gotten into wild lilies in the U.S.
Photographed by: Duane Schultz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Wilson, New York, USA. Date: 14 May, 2017.
Duane says this beetle is eating their lily plants.
Cereal Leaf Beetle (Oulema melanopus or Oulema rufocyanea)
Cereal Leaf Beetle, either Oulema melanopus or Oulema rufocyanea, subfamily Criocerinae, family Chrysomelidae (the leaf beetles).
□ The Cereal Leaf Beetle has metallic green elytra (forewings), on an otherwise orange-red body. It is a small beetle — the photographer says this one was just 5 mm (0.2 inches) long, and gets its common name from its preferred diet of oats and cereal grains. Note: Without dissecting the beetle, it is impossible to tell whether it is the species Oulema melanopus or Oulema rufocyanea.
Photographed and identified to order by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 6 April, 2019.
Bryan found this one on the inside of his patio door.
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Cleridae, the checkered beetles

Red-Legged Ham Beetle, family Lymexylidae
Red-Legged Ham Beetle, Necrobia rufipes, family Cleridae (the checkered beetles).
□ A small insect at just 4.5 mm long (less than 0.2 inches), the Red-Legged Ham Beetle has a metallic blue-green back and reddish-brown to orange legs. Its antennae are also reddish-brown to orange with black, clubbed tips. This little beetle eats dried fish, and also feeds on some fly larvae, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
Photographed by: Suzanne Cuomo. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Wyckoff, New Jersey, USA. Date: 22 March, 2019.
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Lymexylidae, the ship timber beetles

Ship Timber Beetle, family Lymexylidae
Ship Timber Beetle, family Lymexylidae (the ship timber beetles).
□ Very unusual — and huge — eyes! See the next photo to get an appreciation for how long an abdomen this beetle has. Amazing!
Photographed by: Jorge "Izzy" Irizarry. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Puerto Rico. Date: 29 September, 2015.
Jorge says it “was very loud when flying. It died, but before it did it laid around 100 eggs.”
Ship Timber Beetle, family Lymexylidae
Ship Timber Beetle (from a distance to show unique body shape), family Lymexylidae (the ship timber beetles).
Photographed by: Jorge "Izzy" Irizarry. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Puerto Rico. Date: 29 September, 2015.
Ship Timber Beetle, family Lymexylidae
Hatching eggs of the Ship Timber Beetle, family Lymexylidae (the ship timber beetles).
□ Although they are called Ship Timber Beetles, these insects will bore into living trees in addition to the wood of ships and other structures.
Photographed by: Jorge "Izzy" Irizarry. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Puerto Rico. Date: 29 September, 2015.

Carabidae, the ground beetles

Fiery Beetle (Callisthenes calidus)
Fiery Hunter Beetle, Callisthenes calidus, subfamily Carabinae, family Carabidae (the ground beetles).
□ The Fiery Hunter is sometimes called a Fiery Searcher. (It was once listed under the genus Calosoma).
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 24 May, 2012.
Leslie says, “Look at the texture on its elytra (its back), especially highlighted with those tiny red dots. Gorgeous!”
Purple-Rimmed Carabus (Carabus nemoralis)
Purple-Rimmed Carabus, Carabus nemoralis, subfamily Carabinae, family Carabidae (the ground beetles).
□ The Purple-Rimmed Carabus is also known as a European Ground Beetle or Bronze Ground Beetle. It was introduced to the United States, where this photo was taken, from its native Europe.
Photographed and identified to genus by: Ryan King. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Fairview, Michigan, USA. Date: 19 April, 2019.
Ryan says, “I happened upon a beetle under a log ... that looked rather interesting.”
Blue-Spotted Tiger Beetle (Cicindela aurulenta)
Blue-Spotted Tiger Beetle, also known as Gold-Spotted Tiger Beetle, Cicindela aurulenta, subfamily Cicindelinae, family Carabidae (the ground beetles).
Photographed by: Abhiroop Singh Gill. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Amritsar, India. Date: 18 November, 2016.
Six-Spotted Tiger Beetle (Cicindela sexguttata)
Six-Spotted Tiger Beetle, Cicindela sexguttata, subfamily Cicindelinae, family Carabidae (the ground beetles).
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 28 May, 2012.
Leslie says, “That green metallic is even prettier in person.”
Six-Spotted Tiger Beetle (Cicindela sexguttata)
Six-Spotted Tiger Beetle, Cicindela sexguttata, subfamily Cicindelinae, family Carabidae (the ground beetles).
Photographed and identified by: Kyle Lengerich. Location: Indiana, USA. Date: 2019.
Ground Beetle (Scaritus spp.)
Tiger Beetle in the genus Cicindela, likely a Bronzed Tiger Beetle, Cicindela repanda, subfamily Cicindelinae, family Carabidae (the ground beetles).
□ This pair of photos show not only the scrolled markings on this Tiger Beetle’s back, but also the metallic coloration on its body and legs, and the multitude of hairs on this insect. See the comment below about these insects, which were photographed on the harder, upland sandy bank at the very edge of a reservoir.
Photographed and identified to order by: Jo Belasco. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Wheatland, Wyoming, USA. Date: 13 June, 2019.
Jo’s sister Dawn sent in the photos, and she says, “It was a sunny day and the sand was warm. These creatures were hopping all over the sand, mating, and reminded me of water striders in the way they moved. (They are clearly not water striders; I am only telling you how they seemed to skitter about on the sand.)” To see a water strider, click here.
Ground Beetle (Scaritus spp.)
Ground Beetle, either Scarites quadriceps or Scarites vicinus, subfamily Scaritinae, family Carabidae (the ground beetles).
Photographed by: Eric Grewe. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Novi, Michigan, USA. Date: 16 June, 2015.
Eric found this beetle at work. Insects are indeed everywhere!
Tyrant Ground Beetle (Scaritus spp.)
Tyrant Ground Beetle, also known as a Spotted Ground Beetle, in the genus Anthia, probably Anthia mitchelli, subfamily Anthiinae, family Carabidae (the ground beetles).
□ The Tyrant Ground Beetle has a gland at the rear of the abdomen from which it can squirt a chemical secretion that contains some bad-tasting and bad-smelling chemicals. See the photographer’s comment below about how her dog learned about this ability.”
Photographed by: Lindsey Southern. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Whiteriver, Mpumalanga, South Africa. Date: 6 May, 2019.
Lindsey says, “It seems to also squirt an unpleasant liquid out its butt, as when my dog went close to it — to sniff it — she came away very suddenly and was trying to wipe off her muzzle.
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Tenebrionidae, the darkling beetles

Darkling Beetle (Eleodes)
Darkling Beetle, probably in the genus Eleodes, subfamily Tenebrioninae, family Tenebrionidae (the darkling beetles).
□ Darkling Beetles are sometimes called Clown Beetles, because of their habit of running around rather crazily and sometimes doing a headstand when they are threatened.
Photographed and identified to order by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: city of South San Francisco, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 28 April, 2017.
Darkling Beetle (Eleodes)
Darkling Beetle, probably in the genus Eleodes, subfamily Tenebrioninae, family Tenebrionidae (the darkling beetles).
□ Darkling Beetles are sometimes called Stink Beetles because one of their defensive mechanisms is to emit a smelly secretion from their rear ends.
Photographed and identified to order by: Thomas Langhans. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: city of South San Francisco, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 28 April, 2017.
Thomas says, “This one was in a real hurry to get somewhere. It was large, I can only guess now, perhaps about 4 cm (1.6 inches).”
Darkling Beetle (Morica planata)
Darkling Beetle, Morica planata, subfamily Pimeliinae, family Tenebrionidae (the darkling beetles).
□ Most beetles raise their hard forewings (called elytra), unfold the pair of membranous flight wings that lie underneath, and fly away. With this species of Darkling Beetle, however, the elytra are fused, so they cannot fly. Notice this species’ characteristic flattened pronotum behind the head.
Photographed and identified to order by: Sanne Houwing. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tibi, Valencia, Spain. Date: 14 June, 2018.
Sanne says, “We encountered this flatheaded fellow at breakfast in Spain.”
Flour Beetle (Tribolium spp.)
Flour Beetle in the genus Tribolium, subfamily Tenebrioninae, family Tenebrionidae (the darkling beetles).
□ There are several species of Flour Beetle, and the two that are especially common in houses just about everywhere in the world are the Red Flour Beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and the Confused Flour Beetle (Tribolium confusum. These tiny beetles look almost identical, and both feed on flour and other grains people store in the pantry. More information about these beetles is available here.
Photographed by: Fatima Amer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dammam, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. Date: 18 March, 2019. Fatima says it is about 4mm (0.15 inches) long. She has discovered a few in her apartment. KnowYourInsects.org says, “They are definitely good and sneaking into homes!”
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Anthicidae, the antlike flower beetles

Monoceros Beetle (Notoxus desertus)
Monoceros Beetle, Notoxus desertus, subfamily Notoxinae, family Anthicidae (the antlike flower beetles).
□ The “horn” projecting forward over the head is a giveaway for the Monoceros Beetle. This beetle is one of the group often described as ant-like. In fact, the submitter described it as about the size of a pea or “small like an ant.” This beetle has two black spots on its back, plus a V-shaped band. See the description in the comment below.
Photographed by: Autumn Highstreet. Submitted by: J. H. Highstreet. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Michigan, USA. Date: 17 June, 2019.
J. H. says, “We have named it the Minecraft bug, since it looks like the creeper face in minecraft.”
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Cerambycidae, the long-horned beetles

Long-horned beetle (Monochamus spp.)
Long-Horned Beetle, in the genus Monochamus, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
Photographed and identified by: Jim Pankey. Location: Chatsworth, Georgia, USA. Date: 27 May, 2014.
White-Spotted Sawyer (Monochamus scutellatus)
Female White-Spotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Females have mottling on the back, gray-and-black banded antennae, and shorter antennae than the males.
Photographed and identified by: Shelli St. Clair. Location: Sterling, Alaska, USA. Date: 14 July, 2016.
White-Spotted Sawyer (Monochamus scutellatus)
Male White-Spotted Sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Compare with female in previous photo. Both males and females have a tiny, white, heart-shaped spot behind the head.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 24 May, 2012.
Long-horned beetle (Monochamus sartor)
Long-Horned Beetle, also known as a Sawyer Beetle, Monochamus sartor, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
Photographed by: Peter Huessy. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Date: 3 August, 2016.
Peter found it in his garden. Location: Sedrun, Switzerland.
Spotted pine sawyer (Monochamus clamator)
Spotted Pine Sawyer, female, Monochamus clamator, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Males have much longer antennae than females. For more information on this beetle, click here.
Photographed by: Sharon Younie. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Outside Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA. Date: 14 January, 2018.
After learning the identity of this beetle, Sharon says, “It makes sense too, since I live on a lot heavily treed with ponderosa pines. We are located in proximity to burned areas from 2013 Black Forest, Colorado, fires. Although we have few if any dead/dying trees on our property, I realize that I did not notice these bugs before the past few years.”
Long-Horned Beetle (Morimus asper funereus)
Long-Horned Beetle, Morimus asper funereus (formerly Morimus funereus), subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This black-spotted, gray Long-Horned Beetle lives in dead or dying wood, especially in old-growth or dense forests. This species is “vulnerable,” which means its numbers are decreasing, in this case because of woodland practices that remove branches and other dead wood from forests.
Photographed by: Stevica Vojnovic. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Subotica, Serbia. Date: 29 July, 2018.
Milkweed Beetles (Tetraopes tetrophthalmus)
Mating pair of Milkweed Beetles, Tetraopes tetrophthalmus, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska, Michigan, USA. Date: 21 June, 2012.
Milkweed Beetle (Tetraopes tetrophthalmus)
Milkweed Beetle, Tetraopes tetrophthalmus, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This one is peeking through a chewed-out hole in a milkweed leaf.
Photographed by: Dave Delman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: New York, USA. Date: 26 November, 2017.
Poplar borer (Saperda calcarata)
Poplar borer, Saperda calcarata, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Zoom in to see the splashes of pale creamy yellow among the delicate black speckles.
Photographed and identified by: Kelly Miller. Location: Fremont, Nebraska, USA. Date: 7 June, 2017.
Kelly says, “We found a poplar borer online and wonder if that’s it! Says they like aspen trees, which we do have one in our backyard.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Yes, that’s it! Great job of identification, Kelly!”
Mesquite girdler (Oncideres rhodosticta)
Mesquite Girdler, Oncideres rhodosticta, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
Photographed and identified to order by: Rodney A. Johnson Jr. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mesa, Arizona, USA. Date: 3 October, 2016.
Mesquite girdler (Oncideres rhodosticta)
Mesquite Girdler, Oncideres rhodosticta, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Mesquite girdlers are also sometimes known as twig-girdling insects.
Photographed and identified to order by: Rodney A. Johnson Jr. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mesa, Arizona, USA. Date: 3 October, 2016.
Longicorn Beetle Borer (Olenecamptus bilobus)
Longicorn Beetle Borer, male, Olenecamptus bilobus, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Male Longicorn Beetle Borers (like this one) have antennae that are twice as long as the body. The number of spots on the wings can vary within this species — some have an additional pair of large spots farther back on the wings.
Photographed by: Chua Kheng Sin. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Singapore. Date: 6 April, 2018.
Chua says, “Saw this insect inside the Gents Toilet today on the wall.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Such a beautiful insect! Great find, Chua!”
Long-horned Borer Beetle (Xylorhiza adusta)
Long-Horned Borer Beetle, Xylorhiza adusta, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This Long-Horned Borer Beetle has unusual hairy elytra (forewings). Most beetles have no such feature. This beetle is found in many parts of Southeast Asia, also northeast into China.
Photographed and identified to family by: K J Westman. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nithulemada, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 9 November, 2018.
K J says, “The wings of my beetle look quite different from the wings of the Long Horn beetles on your webpage.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Yes! Those hairy forewings are amazing!”
Flat-Faced Longhorn (Coptops spp.)
Flat-Faced Longhorn in the genus Coptops, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Flat-Faced Longhorn has both a flat face and long “horns&rdquo (actually long antennae).
Photographed by: Chua Kheng Sin. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Singapore. Date: 2 August, 2018.
Chua says he found this insect “inside the gents toilet” KnowYourInsects.org says, “We’ve never seen a human structure that was impervious to insects!”
Cottonwood Borer (Plectrodera scalator)
Cottonwood Borer, Plectrodera scalator, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Cottonwood Borer grows to 1.25 inches (more than 3 cm) long, not counting the elongate antennae, which can be longer than the body. Its pattern of squarish black marks on a creamy-yellow background set it apart from other beetles.
Photographed and identified by: Mike Toombs. Location: Colorado City, Texas, USA. Date: 18 June, 2018.
Mike took this photo in a backyard with “many older cottonwood trees” there and throughout the city.
Golden-Bloomed Grey Longhorned Beetle (Agapanthia villosoviridescens)
Golden-Bloomed Grey Longhorn Beetle, Agapanthia villosoviridescens, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Golden-Bloomed Grey Longhorned Beetle gets the "golden-bloomed" part of its name from the gold bloom of color on the pair of speckled wings that cover its abdomen. Its antennae are quite characteristic too, with the black-and-white striping and the initial thicker black antennal segment.
Photographed by: Alexandra Manning. Location: Northampton, UK. Date: 31 May, 2019.
Alexandra says she took this photo after this beetle landed on her arm.
Flat-Faced Long-Horned Beetle (Urgleptes querci)
Flat-Faced Long-Horned Beetle, Urgleptes querci, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This Flat-Faced Long-Horned Beetle has an intricate pattern on its back. The pattern varies quite widely among individuals, but all share the wide black band near the rear and the two black spots behind it (although the spots may be faint).
Photographed by: Victor Leverenz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oxford, Michigan, USA. Date: 8 June, 2019.
Victor says, “The body is about 1/8 inch and the antenna are much longer. Noticed it sitting on my desk.”
Long-Horned Beetle (Cereopsius spp.)
Long-Horned Beetle in the genus Cereopsius, subfamily Lamiinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This Long-Horned Beetle has striking, light-colored markings on a dark background, and a graceful curve to its antennae.
Photographed by: Amirul Zahil. Identified by: entomologist Suksawat Poninij, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand. Thank you Professor Poninij! Location: Penang Hill, Penang, Malaysia. Date: 7 April, 2019.
Brown prionid (Orthosoma brunneum)
Brown Prionid, Orthosoma brunneum, subfamily Prioninae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Despite the rather large and strong jaws on this beetle, the adults are believed to eat very little, if at all. In their short adult lives, the main task is to mate.
Photographed by: Molly Bengelink. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Holland, Michigan, USA. Date: 18 July, 2016.
Molly says, “I have never seen anything like that around our house before and it had us all a little curious (and somewhat uneasy initially).”
Brown prionid (Orthosoma brunneum)
Brown Prionid, Orthosoma brunneum, subfamily Prioninae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The photo at right shows a close-up of the Brown Prionid, and makes evident the small spines extending from the thorax. Also note the large jaws on this big beetle. The beetle is not aggressive, but if it is provoked (especially if it is cornered and can’t get away), it will defend itself as best it can and might even bite.
Photographed by: Dave Delman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tucson, Arizona, U.S. Date: 5 January, 2018.
Dave says, “It was really big!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Yes, they can reach almost 2 inches long (nearly 5 cm)!
Brown prionid (Orthosoma brunneum)
Brown Prionid, Orthosoma brunneum, subfamily Prioninae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This species can grow to between 1–1.9 inches long (2.5–4.8 cm), so it’s a good-sized beetle!
Photographed by: Rob Fox. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ross (near Pittsburgh), Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 4 August, 2017.
Rob says, “It was approx. 1.5" in length.”
Prionid Beetle (Stenodontes spp.)
Prionid Beetle, male, in the genus Stenodontes, subfamily Prioninae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Note the long, narrow jaws on this male! The Stenodontes genus has three species: Stenodontes chevrolati, Stenodontes damicornis and Stenodontes exsertus, the latter two of which are found in Puerto Rico, where this photo was taken. Insect expert Antonio Santos-Silva noted that Stenodontes chevrolati is not formally recorded in Puerto Rico, but it may well also occur in that country. From this photo alone, he was unable to determine exactly which species it is.
Photographed by: Juraj Bajgar. Submitted and identified to order by: Clara Bajgar. Identified to family by: KnowYourInsects.org. Identified to genus by: Antonio Santos-Silva, an entomologist at the University of São Paulo. Thank you Dr. Santos-Silva! Location: Represa Lago Guajataca (about two hours from San Juan), Puerto Rico. Date: 19 September, 2018.
Clara notes that this beetle was quite large — about 7 cm (3 inches) long.
California Prionus (Prionus californicus)
California Prionus, female, Prionus californicus, subfamily Prioninae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This is the adult California Prionus. The adult female can grow to 2 inches (5 cm) in body length, sometimes even larger. The male is smaller, and reaches 1.5-1.75 inches long (3.8-4.4 cm) long. The larvae, or grubs, of this species and related species are sometimes called giant root borers and, when in large numbers, can cause damage to trees.
Photographed by: Michelle Hughes. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Stevenson Ranch, California, USA. Date: 6 July, 2018.
Michelle says the body was about 2 inches (5 cm) long!
Broad-Necked Root Borer (Prionus laticollis)
Broad-Necked Root Borer, Prionus laticollis, subfamily Prioninae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ As their name implies, they eat roots of trees and shrubs — usually going after trees and shrubs that are unhealthy.
Photographed and identified to order by: Louise Sandler. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 7 August, 2017.
Louise says, “The head and body were about 2 inches long!”
Rustic borer (Xylotrechus colonus)
Rustic borer, Xylotrechus colonus, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This beetle has some gorgeous patterning on its back (the patterning is actually on its hardened forewings, which are called elytra). This beetle was once in a different genus and had the scientific name of Clytus colonus.
Photographed by: Amy Jones. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Milford, Sussex County, Delaware, USA. Date: 6 May, 2017.
Amy says, “I've never seen anything like this before. It showed up in our house yesterday.”
Locust borer (Megacyllene robiniae)
Locust Borer, Megacyllene robiniae, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This species is called a Locust Borer because it most notably does damage to black locust trees. Adults are about 3/4 inch long (1.9 cm).
Photographed by: Gordon Goos. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Benton County, Washington, USA. Date: 1 September, 2017.
Gordon says, “Found several more this evening. One was eating flesh from a freshly cracked ripe cantaloupe.”
Long-horned beetle (Obrium circumflexum)
Long-Horned Beetle, Obrium circumflexum, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
Photographed and identified to order by: Bárbara Escudero Alejos. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lima, Peru. Date: 20 December, 2017.
Bárbara says, “I took this photo next to my bathroom at midday, but the day before it was walking over my arm.”
Monkey Pod Round-Headed Borer (Xystrocera globosa)
Monkeypod Round-Headed Borer, Xystrocera globosa, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ A close look at this beetle reveals the two dark stripes running down its back: one on each of its wings. It is known as a Monkeypod Borer because it bores into monkeypod trees, which were introduced to and now grow in many parts of Hawaii.
Photographed by: Rikita Turner. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oahu, Hawaii, USA. Date: 20 September, 2017.
Rikita says, “This was in my ceiling.”
Monkey Pod Round-Headed Borer (Xystrocera globosa)
Monkeypod Round-Headed Borer, Xystrocera globosa, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Monkeypod Round-Headed Borer can easily grow to 3.2 cm (1.3 inches) long, and that is just the body. With the antennae, it can be twice that length. This species has spread to warm climates around the world.
Photographed by: Juraj Bajgar. Submitted by: Clara Bajgar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico. Date: 6 September, 2018.
Clara notes the “black ‘eye brows.’
Wasp borer (Neoclytus conjunctus)
Wasp Borer, also known as a Western Ash Borer, Neoclytus conjunctus, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Wasp Borer is a species of high elevations in the western U.S. and up into Canada.
Photographed by: Todd Phelps. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Humboldt County, California, USA. Date: 17 June, 2012.
Todd found this beetle at 2,400 feet elevation near the coast.
Wasp borer (Neoclytus conjunctus)
Wasp Borer, Neoclytus conjunctus, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Wasp Borer gets its name because its yellow patterning (shown in previous photo) gives the impression of a wasp, and because it makes boreholes, like those shown here in this piece of wood.
Photographed by: Todd Phelps. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Humboldt County, California, USA. Date: 17 June, 2012.
Wasp borer (Neoclytus conjunctus)
Wasp Borer, also known as a Western Ash Borer, Neoclytus conjunctus, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The pattern on the thorax of this Wasp Borer is evident in this photo. The Wasp Borer is also known as a Western Ash Borer, because the larvae bore into the wood of dead and dying ash trees. The larvae will also get into other wood, including that of oak and arbutus.
Photographed by: Arnold Lundwall. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Montana, USA. Date: 20 February, 2019.
Gray-Winged Neoclyt-Borer (Neoclytus scutellaris)
Gray-Winged Neoclyt-Borer, Neoclytus scutellaris, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Gray-Winged Neoclyt-Borer is distinguished from similar-looking species by the yellow band across the upper back (technically the pronotum). The young (the grubs) bore into in oak and hickory trees.
Photographed by: Christin McMahon. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: McKinney, Texas, USA. Date: 2 July, 2018.
Christin found this on her couch, and says, “At first I thought it was some sort of bee, then butterfly — it is rather weak, only somewhat moving its front legs.”
Banded Ash Borer (Neoclytus caprea)
Banded Ash Borer, Neoclytus caprea, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Banded Ash Borer feeds on sapwood of ash, sometimes hickory and oak, in diseased/stressed, dying, dead (or cut) trees. Females lay their eggs on the bark of these trees, the larvae eventually bore into the tree, and they survive the winter as pupae, transforming into adults and emerging in the early spring. Pupa will transform earlier — in winter months — in firewood that is kept indoors. Most people see Banded Ash Borers in their homes in the winter for this reason.
Photographed by: Arthur Dabrowski. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Greenwood Lake, New Jersey, USA. Date: 27 January, 2019.
Ivory-marked longhorn beetle (Eburia haldemani)
Ivory-Marked Long-Horned Beetle, Eburia haldemani, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The doubled light-colored markings are especially noticeable — and elongated — in this beautiful specimen of Ivory-Marked Long-Horned Beetle.
Photographed by: Windy Bond. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. Date: 19 June, 2018.
Long-Horned beetle (Xylotrechus smei)
Long-Horned Beetle, Xylotrechus smei (previously Xylotrechus stebbingi), subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ To see the subtle differences between Xylotrechus smei and Xylotrechus stebbingi, click here.
Photographed by: Syed Gazanfar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kashmir, India. Date: 23 April, 2018.
Banded Alder Borer (Rosalia funebris)
Banded Alder Borer, Rosalia funebris, subfamily Cerambycinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The Banded Alder Borer is black and white or (blue-tinged white) with bands on its antennae and on its back (actually its forewings or elytra), and a large black spot in the center of a white thorax. According to Washington University entomologist Arthur Antonelli, this beetle is sometimes attracted to wet paint. Some believe the paint smell may be similar to beetle’s own pheromones.
Photographed by: Michael Toombs. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Wenatchee, Washington, USA. Date: 22 July, 2018.
Peggy says, “ I’ve never seen one before.”
Flower Longhorn Beetle (Trigonarthris proxima)
Flower Long-Horned Beetle, Trigonarthris proximas, subfamily Lepturinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This beetle has some fuzz on its thorax — actually on the shield-like structure (called the pronotum) that covers the thorax.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 17 June, 2012.
Yellow velvet longhorned beetle (Lepturobosca chrysocoma)
Yellow Velvet Long-Horned Beetle, Lepturobosca chrysocoma, subfamily Lepturinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ Look closely to see the very distinctive gold-colored “velvet,” which scientists call pubescence, on the thorax (specifically the pronotum). This Yellow Velvet Long-Horned Beetle also has pubescence on the long wings (elytra) that cover its back.
Photographed by: Dave Delman, M.D. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org with help from Audrey Maran. Location: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Date: 4 July, 2017.
Douglas Fir Beetle (Centrodera spurca)
Douglas Fir Beetle, also known as yellow Douglas fir borer, Centrodera spurca, subfamily Lepturinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
Photographed and identified to order by: Carson Wille. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Near the Alsea River in the Siuslaw forest, mid-coast Oregon, USA. Date: 16 June, 2016.
Carson says, “We found the beetle at our house.... It was around 1.5 inches long.”
Red-shouldered Pine Borer (Stictoleptura canadensis)
Red-Shouldered Beetle or Red-Shouldered Pine Borer, Stictoleptura canadensis, subfamily Lepturinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This Red-Shouldered Pine Borer is holding its stiff upper wings (called elytra) away from its body, allowing the membranous wings beneath to be seen.
Photographed by: Alexander Tonkinson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Wiltshire, UK. Date: 11 August, 2017.
Jessamie Tonkinson, who sent in her husband’s photo, says she saw this one buzzing around the back wall of her house in the garden. She notes that it had most of its wings exposed, and was roughly 12mm (about 0.5 inches) in length.
Black-Spotted Longhorn Beetle (Rhagium mordax)
Black-Spotted Longhorn Beetle, also known as Black-Spotted Long-Horned Beetle, Rhagium mordax, subfamily Lepturinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ This Black-Spotted Longhorn Beetle has shorter antennae than most of the beetles in this family. The pattern on its back (its upper wings, or elytra) is reminescent of a marled wool sweater.
Photographed by: Daryl Fleming. Submitted by: Helen Williams. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Woodleigh, Devon, UK. Date: 7 May, 2018.
Helen says, “Found this chap in a garden.” She adds, “It’s a lovely looking one.” KnowYourInsects.org agrees!
Spotted Longhorn Beetle (Strangalia maculata or Rutpela maculata)
Spotted Longhorn Beetle, also known as a Black and Yellow Longhorn, Rutpela maculata (formerly Strangalia maculata), subfamily Lepturinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
□ The row of spots about a third of the way back on the wings can be quite variable. In some individuals, the spots may be almost absent, and in others, they can be quite large (the central pair on this specimen form a heart shape). Note: The genus name has been updated from Strangalia to Rutpela.
Photographed and identified by: Iggy Tavares. Location: Lloyds Park, Croydon, UK. Date: 18 September, 2018.
Long-horned beetle, possibly Centrodera sublineata, (family Cerambycidae)
Long-Horned Beetle, possibly Centrodera sublineata, subfamily Lepturinae, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
Photographed to family by: Mike Toombs. Identified to possible species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Fluvanna, Texas, USA. Date: 5 July, 2018.
Mike described the area where he found this insect as “the arid west Texas region with mesquite-infested rangeland and cotton/wheat/grain sorghum production.”
Long-horned beetle (family Cerambycidae)
Long-Horned Beetle, family Cerambycidae (the long-horned beetles).
Photographed by: Leah McPherson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Highland, Michigan, USA. Date: 25 July, 2016.
Leah says, “It crawled in front of me and I attempted to catch it and when I did it made a very unnerving sound, like a creepy cricket.”
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Cantharidae, the soldier beetles

Goldenrod Soldier Beetles mating (Chauliognathus pensylvanicus)
Goldenrod Soldier Beetles, Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, subfamily Chauliognathinae, family Cantharidae (the soldier beetles).
□ Look closely to see the female underneath the male — and yes, they’re mating. As with many insect species, the female is often larger than the male. Instead of sitting on goldenrod, this pair is on milkweed. Compare the Goldenrod Soldier Beetle to the Margined Leatherwing (Chauliognathus marginatus) elsewhere on this page, and note the different orientation of the black bar on the pronotum (thorax) — this helps to distinguish the two.
Photographed by: Diana Koss. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: L’Anse, Michigan, USA. Date: 9 August, 2016.
Margined Leatherwing (Chauliognathus marginatus)
Margined Leatherwing, Chauliognathus marginatus, subfamily Chauliognathinae, family Cantharidae (the soldier beetles).
□ This species has a lot of variation. Some Margined Leatherwings, like this one, have a good deal of black on the elytra. Others, however, just a black spot at the rear of the elytra.
Photographed by: Marv Goldberg. Location: Tamarac, Florida, USA. Date: 17 May, 2019.
Marv says, “Amazing what comes to visit me right outside my door.”
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Brown leatherwing (Pacificanthia consors)
Brown Leatherwing, Pacificanthia consors, subfamily Cantharinae, family Cantharidae (the soldier beetles).
Photographed by: Michael Davis. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: California, USA. Date: 30 April, 2017.
Michael says, “My Dad was involved in horticulture and loved his insects. He would laugh that I took a photo of a solider beetle and had it posted when I was more interested in a different Beatle growing up...”
Brown leatherwing (Pacificanthia consors)
Brown Leatherwing, Pacificanthia consors, subfamily Cantharinae, family Cantharidae (the soldier beetles).
□ This is a type of Soldier Beetle that goes by the common name of Brown Leatherwing. This beetle has a diet that includes many garden pests, including aphids, so it’s good to find it in the yard.
Photographed by: Matt McDowell. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Newark, California, USA. Date: 4 July, 2018.
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Soldier Beetle (Pacificanthia rotundicollis)
Soldier Beetle, Pacificanthia rotundicollis, subfamily Cantharinae, family Cantharidae (the soldier beetles).
□ “You lookin’ at me?” This Soldier Beetle seems to be as curious about the photographer as the photographer is about the beetle in this nice shot! This SOldier Beetle is very similar in appearance to the Brown Leatherwing (see previous photo). In fact, both are in the same genus. One difference is that the legs are all orange in this Soldier Beetle, while they are orange and black in the Brown Leatherwing.
Photographed and identified by: Iggy Tavares. Location: Big Sky Resort, Montana, USA. Date: June, 2015.
Soldier Beetle (Pacificanthia rotundicollis)
Soldier Beetle, Pacificanthia rotundicollis, subfamily Cantharinae, family Cantharidae (the soldier beetles).
□ A nice view from the top!
Photographed by: Judi Ragsdale. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lafayette, (northern) California, USA. Date: 6 June, 2018.
Judi says, “I am a member of a Facebook group of photographers from Flowers From All Over the World and when someone asked me what the insect was I was stumped. Now, I have a name! Thank you for identifying it.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Glad to help!”

Silphidae, the carrion beetles

Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus sayi)
Burying Beetle (also called a carrion beetle), Nicrophorus sayi, subfamily Nicrophorinae, family Silphidae (the carrion beetles).
□ These beetles will dig under a dead animal, such as a mouse, and once the mouse has fallen far enough into their hole, the beetles will bury it. The beetles then lay their eggs in the dead animal, the eggs eventually hatch, and the larvae have a ready meal waiting for them.
Photographed by: Mike Bloodsworth. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Eastern Texas, USA. Date: 11 April, 2017.
Mike says, “You know, I have seen them bury dead things over a few hours before but never seen one this colorful.”
Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus sayi)
Burying Beetle (also called a carrion beetle), Nicrophorus sayi, subfamily Nicrophorinae, family Silphidae (the carrion beetles).
□ Look for the tiny red mites on this beetle (they look like red spots on the thorax.) The mites will ride on the beetle to a dead animal, then hop off when the beetle arrives at a dead animal. What’s in it for the mites? Tasty maggots on the dead animal!
Photographed by: Mike Bloodsworth. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Eastern Texas, USA. Date: 11 April, 2017.
Mike says, “Upon enlarging the photograph I saw that there were eight mites on the insect and it seemed to be agitated by the mites. I took several shots of it at the time, and then another one about 30 minutes later and all of the mites were gone.”
Sexton Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus investigator)
Red and Black Banded Sexton Burying Beetle (also called a Sexton Beetle), Nicrophorus investigator, subfamily Nicrophorinae, family Silphidae (the carrion beetles).
□ These beetles are good fliers, and may travel a mile to track down the scent of a dead animal. Like other burying beetles, they literally bury dead animals, then lay eggs alongside. The eggs hatch and the larva feed on the dead animal.
Photographed and identified by: Lindsey Christie. Location: Scotland. Date: 24 June, 2017.
Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus defodiens)
Sexton Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus defodiens, subfamily Nicrophorinae, family Silphidae (the carrion beetles).
□ This Sexton Burying Beetle is almost a perfect match for the Red and Black Banded Sexton Burying Beetle (pictured elsewhere on this page). This one, however, has this combination of characteristic features: 1) all-black antennae (no dark-red tips); and 2) the rear red patch on each wing is completely surrounded by black.
Photographed and identified to order by: Dave Delman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Yellowstone National Park, U.S. Date: 4 July, 2017.
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Dermestidae, the dermestid or skin beetles

Larder beetle (Dermestes lardarius)
Larder Beetle, Dermestes lardarius, subfamily Dermestinae, family Dermestidae (the dermestid or skin beetles).
□ These beetles (and their larvae) are very common in houses. They are called larder beetles, because they are often found in the larder, which is an old-fashioned term for a pantry room or food-storage cabinet.
Photographed by: Erin Mackay. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ohio, USA. Date: 3 April, 2017.
Larder beetle (Dermestes lardarius)
Larder Beetle, Dermestes lardarius, subfamily Dermestinae, family Dermestidae (the dermestid or skin beetles).
□ As the photographer discovered, these little creatures can sneak into a suitcase and be inadvertently transported from one location (in her case, that was a Texas motel room) to another (her house across the country).
Photographed by: Kasey Mangold. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Austin, Texas, and New Hampshire, USA. Date: 12 May, 2016.
Kasey says, “They seem to like the shower. They can fly but don’t do it often.”
Carpet beetle (Attagenus unicolor)
Carpet Beetle, likely Black Carpet Beetle, Attagenus unicolor, subfamily Attageninae, family Dermestidae (the dermestid or skin beetles).
□ The tuft of long hairs at the rear end is typical of Black Carpet Beetles. They are common insects in homes, where they find and dine on cereals and other grain-type products.
Photographed by: Megan Hartley. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: northern New Jersey, USA. Date: 21 September, 2017.
Megan says, “This guy molted, as you can see the shell.... (It was) in the back of my silverware drawer in a bottle cap.”
Varied carpet beetle (Anthrenus verbasci)
Varied Carpet Beetle, larva, Anthrenus verbasci, subfamily Megatominae, family Dermestidae (the dermestid or skin beetles).
□ One way to distinguish the larva of a Varied Carpet Beetle from the similar Furniture Carpet Beetle (Anthrenus flavipes or Black Carpet Beetle (Anthrenus unicolor is to look at the shape of the body. The larva of a Varied Carpet Beetle is wider toward the rear and narrower toward the head. And in case you are not sure where the head is, it is toward the left in this photo.
Photographed by: Jon R. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Herndon, Virginia, USA. Date: 8 October, 2017.
Jon says, “I found it today in my kitchen, near the sink. The insect is 3mm long.... It moves extremely slowly.”
Varied carpet beetle larva (Anthrenus verbasci)
Varied Carpet Beetle, larva, Anthrenus verbasci, subfamily Megatominae, family Dermestidae (the dermestid or skin beetles).
□ Another feature of the larva of a Varied Carpet Beetle is the thick tuft of brush-like hairs on its back end. The tuft is clearly evident in this excellent photo. They are frequently found in houses.
Photographed by: Don L. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oklahoma, USA. Date: 17 November, 2017.
Don says, “This little guy is 4 mm long, typically noticed solitary on counter tops, often overlooked as being a piece of fuzz or lint. He may sit motionless for days. When he does move, his speed is almost imperceptible. If disturbed, he freezes, appearing dead. After being left alone, he’ll right himself and begin to move only a short distance (an inch or two) before stopping.”
Varied carpet beetle larva (Anthrenus verbasci)
Varied Carpet Beetle, Anthrenus verbasci, subfamily Megatominae, family Dermestidae (the dermestid or skin beetles).
□ The quarter illustrates the small size of these pretty little beetles. The larvae are shown in the previous photos on this page.
Photographed by: Carey Ann Atherton. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Owensboro, Kentucky, USA. Date: 3 April, 2018.
Carey Ann says, “These images were taken at night (around 10 p.m.).”
Varied carpet beetle larva (Anthrenus verbasci)
Varied Carpet Beetle, Anthrenus verbasci, subfamily Megatominae, family Dermestidae (the dermestid or skin beetles).
□ This photo shows the pair of filmy, membranous wings just peeking out from the rear of this Varied Carpet Beetle. Normally, these membranous wings are hidden beneath the zig-zag patterned forewings (called elytra), which cover most of the beetle’s back.
Photographed by: Will Plemmons. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA. Date: 4 May, 2019.
Will described this beetle as about the size of a BB.
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Phengodidae, the glowworm beetles
Silvanidae, the flat bark or silvanid beetles

Glowworm beetle, Phengodes plumosa
Glowworm Beetle, male, Phengodes plumosa, family Phengodidae (the glowworm beetles).
□ The male Glowworm Beetles are impressive with those plume-like antennae. The females, on the other hand, look like grubs and they are bioluminescent ... so they glow!
Photographed by: Jill Roberts. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Milledgeville, Georgia, USA. Date: 30 June, 2017.
Jill says, “It is the weirdest bug I’ve ever seen around these parts.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “We love ‘weird’!”
Add your photo here! Saw-toothed grain beetle (Oryzaephilus surinamensis or Oryzaephilus mercator)
Saw-Toothed Grain Beetle, Oryzaephilus surinamensis or Oryzaephilus mercator, subfamily Silvaninae, family Silvanidae (the flat bark or silvanid beetles).
□ The Saw-Toothed Grain Beetle is a quite common household pest. It feeds on grain or whatever other pantry food it can find, and it’s a small insect, so it can get in even the tiniest of places. Note the tiny spikes on its thorax — they help to identify this beetle as one of the two species mentioned.
Photographed by: Laura Vasquez. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: central Minnesota, USA. Date: 1 July, 2018.

Meloidae, the blister beetles

Oil beetles mating (Meloe spp.)
Oil Beetle in the genus Meloe, subfamily Meloinae, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
Photographed by: Chris G. Briggs Sr. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: northern Muskegon County, Michigan, USA. Date: 5 October, 2015.
Craig says, “A lone one was cutting through a grass blade with short, strong mandibles.”
Oil Beetle (Meloe spp.)
Oil Beetle in the genus Meloe, subfamily Meloinae, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
□ When disturbed, Oil Beetles release fluid from their joints (as seen here). It is sometimes called “reflexive bleeding” — the fluid is distasteful to potential predators, so it serves a protective function.
Photographed by: Pat (no last name given). Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Belding, Michigan, USA. Date: 7 October, 2014.
Oil Beetle (Meloe spp.)
Oil Beetle, Meloe angusticollis, subfamily Meloinae, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
Photographed by: Alexandra Scheumann, WoodHeaven Photography. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Hurleyville, Sullivan County, New York, USA. Date: 20 October, 2017.
Oil Beetle (Meloe impressus)
Oil Beetles, mating pair, in the genus Meloe, possibly Meloe impressus, subfamily Meloinae, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
□ The photographer described the larger one (the female) as being approximately 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) long, and the smaller one (the male) at about 1.25 inches (3.2 cm) long. The size along with the flared antennal segment about halfway down each of his antennae suggests they are the species Meloe impressus. See the photographer’s comments below.
Photographed and identified to genus by: Susan Anderson. Identified to tentative species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Date: 25 November, 2018.
Susan found this pair in her garden. She says they “seemed green in sunlight.”
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Oil Beetle (Meloe spp.)
Oil Beetle in the genus Meloe, subfamily Meloinae, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
□ One feature of Oil Beetles is that the thorax is considerably narrower than the abdomen, and also narrower than the head. Although it may look from the top view that the last pair of legs sprouts from the abdomen, all six of its legs arise from the thorax. (This is true of all adult insects.)
Photographed and identified by: Josh Bozarth. Location: Proud Lake Recreation Area, Wixom, Michigan, USA. Date: 31 October, 2018.
Oil beetle (Meloe proscarabaeus)
Oil Beetle, probably Meloe proscarabaeus, subfamily Meloinae, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
□ This oil beetle is indeed a bright blue color — lovely! Oil beetle experts Carolina Bravo and Mario García-París tentatively identified this oil beetle as the species Meloe proscarabaeus, but Dr. Bravo notes that without a good view of the mesonotum (the middle segment of the thorax), there is also a possibility that it could be the species Meloe violaceus.
Photographed and identified as an oil beetle by: Matthew Rodda. Identified to genus and tentative species by: Carolina Bravo of the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales-CSIC (the National Museum of Natural History of Spain) and Mario García-París of the Spanish National Research Council. Thank you for the identification, Dr. Bravo and Dr. García-París!
Location: Adjara, country of Georgia (between Western Asia and Eastern Europe). Date: 4 March, 2018.
Matthew says, “Found on the ground in a rainforest in Adjara, (country of) Georgia.”
Margined Blister Beetle (Epicauta pestifera)
Margined Blister Beetle, Epicauta pestifer, subfamily Meloinae, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
Photographed by: Anonymous. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Adrian, Michigan, USA. Date: July, 2014.
Blister Beetle (Mylabris pustulata)
Blister Beetle, Mylabris pustulata, subfamily Meloinae, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
□ They actually do cause blistering if they are handled.
Photographed by: Ajay Antony. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamilnadu, India. Date: 24 May, 2017.
Blister Beetle (family Meloidae)
Blister Beetle, species unknown, family Meloidae (the blister beetles).
□ KnowYourInsects.org could not positively identify this beetle — if you know what it is, please let us know!
Photographed by: Ajay Antony. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamilnadu, India. Date: 24 May, 2017.
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Oedemeridae, the false blister beetles

Wharf Borer (Nacerdes melanura)
Wharf Borer, Nacerdes melanura, subfamily Oedemerinae, family Oedemeridae (the false blister beetles).
□ Wharf Borer larvae (grubs) bore long tunnels in moist, decaying wood, often in wharfs, but anywhere they can find moist wood. The adults only live a week, and they usually emerge all at once.
Photographed and identified to order by: Mattias Lindstedt. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: southern Spain. Date: 9 June, 2018.
Mattias says, “Length without antennas approx. 2 cm.” That’s a bit less than an inch long.
Flower Beetle (Ischnomera cyanea)
Flower Beetle, or Thick-Legged Flower Beetle, Ischnomera cyanea, subfamily Oedemerinae, family Oedemeridae (the false blister beetles).
□ One of the features of this Flower Beetle — besides the beautiful metallic blue-green color — is that it sometimes holds its forewings (elytra) partially open, just as is shown in this photo.
Photographed by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 1 August, 2018.
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Staphylinidae, the rove beetles

Rove Beetle (Staphylinus caesareus)
Imperial Rove Beetle, Staphylinus caesareus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ A very similar-looking rove beetle is the species Staphylinus erythropterus. Photographed by: Yodfat. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Swiss. Date: 29 March, 2017.
Yodfat says, “I actually saw him on my window, which is in full sun and (on the) second floor above a busy road.”
Rove Beetle (Staphylinus erythropterus)
Rove Beetle, likely Staphylinus erythropterus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ To distinguish two very similar rove beetles — Staphylinus caesarus (previous photo) from Staphylinus erythropterus (next photo), look at the triangle (called the scutellum) between the front of the forewings (which are called elytra). The arrow here shows the scutellum.
Photographed by: Oliver Davies. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: South Wales, UK. Date: 27 August, 2017.
Rove Beetle (Staphylinus erythropterus)
Rove Beetle, likely Staphylinus erythropterus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ The light-colored scutellum helps distinguish this species from the very similar-looking Imperial Rove Beetle, Staphylinus caesareus. To see a good photo comparison between the two species (the writing is in Italian), click here.
Photographed by: Oliver Davies. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: South Wales, UK. Date: 27 August, 2017.
Oliver found this beetle in his dog’s pen.
Devil’s Coach Horse Beetle (Ocypus spp.)
Devil’s Coach Horse Beetle in the genus Ocypus subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ Devil’s Coach Horse: What a great name! Note the small wings that extend a short way down its abdomen. This is characteristic of rove beetles.
Photographed and identified by: Neil Harris-Hutchins. Location: Bratton Fleming, North Devon, England. Date: 5 September, 2016.
KnowYourInsects.org says, “Great job on the ID, Neil!”
Devil’s Coach Horse Beetle (Ocypus spp.)
Devil’s Coach Horse Beetle in the genus Ocypus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ Devil’s Coach Horse Beetles will often strut around with their abdomens curled up like this.
Submitted by: Sandra Cole. Photographed by: Andrew Knight. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Portland, Oregon, USA. Date: 10 October, 2018.
Sandra says, “Large, black, six-legged thing found in waste-water plant.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Thanks to Sandra Cole for sending in her son Andrew’s photo!
Hairy Rove Beetle (Creophilus maxillosus)
Hairy Rove Beetle, Creophilus maxillosus, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ This Hairy Rove Beetle is an inch long. Look closely to see the setae (the hairs) on its abdomen. The short elytra (forewings) are also covered with hair, and the membranous hind wings are poking out from beneath them.
Photographed by: Mary Beth Barenborg. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Identification verified by entomologist Frank Carle of Rutgers University. Thank you, Dr. Carle! Location: Trenton, New Jersey, USA. Date: 21 August, 2017.
Mary Beth says she found two in her house — the first was in a clean, plastic mixing bowl sitting on the kitchen counter, and the second was a dinner guest that dropped from the ceiling light fixture “and landed on the center of the table!”
Brown Rove Beetle (Platydracus maculosus)
Brown Rove Beetle, Platydracus maculosus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ One of the especially interesting things about this photo is that it shows the filmy hind wings peaking out from behind the short, hard forewings (called elytra). This cool beetle was found on the playground of a middle school — specifically Westfield Day School — by classmates Cole and Brian. Thanks to Mrs. De Silva and her whole class!
Photographed by: Shiromi De Silva. Identified by: Dr. Al Newton, curator emeritus of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. Thank you, Dr. Newton! Location: Armonk, New York, USA. Date: 2 November, 2017.
Brown Rove Beetle (Platydracus maculosus)
Brown Rove Beetle, Platydracus maculosus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ The Large Rove Beetle is quite similar in appearance to the Gold-and-Brown Rove Beetles, but it is larger. In fact, the Large Rove Beetle is the largest in the United States, according to the identifier Dr. Al Newton. Large Rove Beetles can reach about an inch (2.5 cm) long, while Gold-and-Brown reach 0.5-0.8 inches (1.5-2.0 cm) long.
Photographed by: Stephen J. Taylor. Identified by: Dr. Al Newton, curator emeritus of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. Thank you, Dr. Newton! Location: Lake Orion, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 October, 2016.
Stephen says, “I’m glad I let him be. Wasn’t sure if it was some kind of queen termite or something!”
Brown Rove Beetle (Platydracus maculosus)
Brown Rove Beetle, Platydracus maculosus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ Rove beetles will often curl up its hind end, much like a scorpion. That curl is evident in this photo.
Photographed by: Stephen J. Taylor. Identified by: Dr. Al Newton, curator emeritus of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. Thank you, Dr. Newton! Location: Lake Orion, Michigan, USA. Date: 23 October, 2016.
KnowYourInsects.org says, “This is a quite unusual insect, so thank you, Stephen, for sending it in!”
Rove Beetle (Platydracus immaculatus)
Rove Beetle, Platydracus immaculatus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ This pretty Rove Beetle is a mix of reddish-brown, dark brown, yellowish-tan and black. The light-colored spots on its abdomen, along with the red-brown head and elytra (the short wings) help to identify this species.
Photographed by: Shirley Faust. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Andreas, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 26 September, 2018.
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Brown Rove Beetle (Platydracus maculosus) and Japanese Beetle (Popillia japonica)
Brown Rove Beetle, Platydracus maculosus, subfamily Staphylininae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ The photographer videotaped a battle between this Brown Rove Beetle and this Japanese Beetle (Popillia japonica). These are screen grabs from the video. See her comment below.
Photographed and identified as a Japanese Beetle by: Sharon VanLoozenoord. Rove Beetle identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Belmont, Michigan, USA. Date: 14 July, 2018.
Sharon witnessed the fight among some wood chips in her herb garden. On the following day, she reported, “I was in my herb garden again this morning and looked for another ‘fight,’ but I’ll probably never see that again.”
Tachyporus hypnorum
Staphylinid Beetle (no common name), Tachyporus hypnorum, subfamily Tachyporinae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ This unusual-looking beetle only measured about 4 mm (0.16 inches) long. Compare that to the Devil’s Coach Horse Beetle and Imperial Rove Beetle, which both grow to around 25 mm (1 inch) long.
Photographed by: Ben Dobson, aka The Microscope Man for his microscope-aided photography. Identified by: Mark Telfer. (Thank you, Mark!) Location: Cambridge, UK. Date: 4 August, 2017.
Ben says, “I found it in on an old log. I’ve used a microscope to photograph (this is a serious hobby).” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Cool hobby!”
Rove Beetle larva (family Staphylinidae)
Rove Beetle, larva, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
□ The two spiky, tail-like appendages (called urogomphi) identify this as a beetle larva. There are a two beetle families with larvae that look almost alike: the rove beetles (Staphylinidae); and the ground beetles (Carabidae). One of the differences between the two is in the number of segments in the “shin” (tibia). If there is one segment, it is a larva of a rove beetle.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 7 February, 2018.
Thomas says, “It was about 22 mm long.”
Rove Beetle larva (subfamily Paederinae)
Rove Beetle, larva, probably in the subfamily Paederinae, family Staphylinidae (the rove beetles).
Photographed by: Stefan Toft Christensen. Identified by: Alexey Solodovnikov of the Biosystematics Department at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. Thank you, Dr. Solodovnikov! Location: Northjutland, Denmark. Date: 2 October, 2018.
Stefan says he found this creature in his house, and believes it came in with his garden plants, which he brought inside the previous day.

Scarabaeidae, the scarab beetles

Bumble Flower Beetle (Euphoria inda)
Bumble Flower Beetle, Euphoria inda, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ Check out this beetle’s amazing fur coat.
Photographed by: Lucy Solar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Spokane, Washington, USA. Date: 4 September, 2017.
Lucy says, “These guys were just around a day or two, and then went somewhere else, since I haven’t seen them again. Maybe they are starting hibernation, since it has gotten rather cold.”
Bumble Flower Beetle (Euphoria inda)
Bumble Flower Beetles, Euphoria inda, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ A row of these cute beetles! Each is about a half-inch long (1.25 cm). Bumble Flower Beetles get their common name from their lazy flight — similar to that of a bumble bee. Bumble Flower Beetles buzz around flowers and rotting fruit, looking for sweet nectar and fermenting fruit juices.
Photographed by: Lucy Solar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near Spokane, Washington, USA. Date: 4 September, 2017.
Lucy says, “Yesterday I discovered a couple of these insects on the outside of my compost tumbler. This afternoon I saw a few more, about eight. Most are not moving much, but a couple were flying around, seemingly finding a spot to rest. It has been very hot during the day — around the 90s (32-35°C) — and it’s been dry. It has also been very smoky, due to the forest fires around. I don’t know if these conditions have anything to do with the presence of these insects or not. I don’t remember having seen them before.”
Green June Beetle (Cotinis nitida)
Green June Beetle, Cotinis nitida, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ The Green June Beetle is very similar in appearance to the Green Fruit Beetle (pictured elsewhere on this page). The Green June Beetle is a species of the eastern United States, whereas the Green Fruit Beetle lives on the other side of the country: in the southwestern United States.
Photographed by: Sheldon L. Boyd. Identified by: Audrey Maran. Location: Hopewell, Virginia, USA. Date: 25 July, 2014.
Green June Beetle (Cotinis nitida)
Green June Beetle, Cotinis nitida, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ This is a nice photo of the ventral side (belly) of this Green June Beetle. Notice that all six legs extend from the thorax. This is true of all insects: the legs (and the wings) are attached to the thorax ... and not the abdomen.
Photographed by: Sheldon L. Boyd. Identified by: Audrey Maran. Location: Hopewell, Virginia, USA. Date: 25 July, 2014.
Green June Beetle (Cotinis nitida)
Green June Beetle, Cotinis nitida, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ This Green June Beetle shows off its lovely green-bronze sheen. Green June Beetles are fans of ripe fruit, and can be found on everything from berries to tree fruit.
Photographed by: Mary Bonomo. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Export, near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 6 July, 2018.
Mary says, “Seems like they get flipped on their backs, can’t turn over and die.”
Green Fruit Beetle (Cotinis mutabilis)
Green Fruit Beetle (aka Figeater), Cotinis mutabilis, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ The metallic green of this attractive beetle is set off by the gold stripe down the sides. Green Fruit Beetles are sometimes called Figeaters because they have a taste for figs, although they’ll eat just about any soft fruit, along with tree sap. The larvae are big white grubs that go by the wonderful common name of Crawlybacks!
Photographed by: Pat Callahan. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: near San Diego, California, USA. Date: 19 September, 2017.
Pat’s wife Peg sent in the photo with a note that this beetle is big! She’s right — Green Fruit Beetles grow to about 1.25 inches (3.2 cm)!
Harlequin Flower Beetle (Gymnetis caseyi)
Harlequin Flower Beetle, Gymnetis caseyi, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ The pattern on this Harlequin Flower Beetle looks like a Rorschach ink blot. This is a typical pattern for this species, but some individuals lack the big black blot and instead only have scattered black speckles.
Photographed by: Michael Toombs. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Fluvanna (southeast of Lubbock), Texas, USA. Date: 1 July, 2018.
Mike says the beetles were “drinking the tree sap from a recently pruned red oak tree” on his farm.
Green Rose Chafers (Cetonia aurata)
Green Rose Chafers, or simply Rose Chafers, mating pair, Cetonia aurata, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ These beautiful beetles actually come in different colors: metallic green (as shown here), bronze/copper, and even violet, gray, and bluish-black. They are different from the Rose Chafers seen in North America; that’s a completely separate species (Macrodactylus subspinosus) — can you find them elsewhere on this page?
Photographed by: Jean-Louis Metzger. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Anduze, in the Languedoc, France. Date: 29 April, 2014.
Jean-Louis says, “ These two beetles — thanks to their striking luminescent green colour — caught my eye and my interest.”
Flower Chafer (Heterorrhina elegans)
Flower Chafer, Heterorrhina elegans, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ Like these two Flower Chafers, the males of many species in this family (the scarab beetles) will wrestle — sometimes for access to a female, sometimes over food. These photos clearly show the brilliant, shiny green color of most of the Flower Chafer’s body, as well as the characteristic red/orange coxa (the “hip”).
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sri Lanka. Date: 4 October, 2018.
KnowYourInsects.org says, “Great job getting the top and bottom views of this pair, K J!”
Flower Chafer (Protaetia aurichalcea)
Flower Chafer, Protaetia aurichalcea, subfamily Cetoniinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ This is also one of the Flower Chafers, sometimes called Bébête l'argent or silver beetle. See the photographer’s description of this lovely creature below. And compare it to the Harlequin Flower Beetle found elsewhere on this page.
Photographed and identified to subfamily by: K J Westman. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nithulemada, Digana, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 5 December, 2018.
K J says, “I like the two dots on the forehead (the pronotum actually) pretending to be eyes, while the eyes are on each side of the ‘nose’.”
Grapevine Beetle (Pelidnota punctata)
Grapevine Beetle, Pelidnota punctata, subfamily Rutelinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ Compare this individual Grapevine Beetle from Oklahoma to the other two in this row. This one has more reddish tones, and its legs are quite red. Those in the next two photos — both from the Great Lakes region — are more tan in color and have black legs. Nonetheless, they are the same species.
Photographed and identified by: Randy Sanders. Location: Grove, Oklahoma, USA. Date: 30 June, 2017.
Randy says, “Beetle is sitting on a wooden bench just after storm.”
Grapevine Beetle (Pelidnota punctata)
Grapevine Beetle, Pelidnota punctata, subfamily Rutelinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ Grapevine Beetles are common in the eastern United States and in Ontario, although some extend farther west: to Texas and Oklahoma (as seen in the previous photo). Grapevine Beetles are also sometimes known as Spotted Tan Beetles or a Spotted Junebugs.
Photographed and identified by Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Location: northern Ohio, USA. Date: July, 2016.
Grapevine Beetle (Pelidnota punctata)
Grapevine Beetle (aka spotted Junebug), Pelidnota punctata, subfamily Rutelinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ This species mates at night — under cover of darkness — and the females lay their eggs in the summertime. The eggs hatch into grubs that live underground until the following spring, when they emerge as adults.
Photographed and identified by: Judy Firestone. Location: Oak Park, Oakland County, Michigan, USA. Date: 13 July, 2013.
Grapevine Beetle (Pelidnota punctata)
Grapevine Beetle (aka spotted Junebug), Pelidnota punctata, subfamily Rutelinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ With that reflection, this is just a cool photo of another Grapevine Beetle.
Photographed by: Rebecca Shaver. Identified by: Rebecca and Andrew Shaver. Location: Hastings, Barry County, Michigan, USA. Date: 3 August, 2017.
Rebecca took this photo of the beetle on the car roof. She adds, “It is injured. :(”
Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica)
Japanese Beetle, Popillia japonica, subfamily Rutelinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ The Japanese Beetle is native to Japan — surprise ;-) — and it was first identified in the northeastern United States, specifically New Jersey, in 1916. See the full story here. It has since spread far and wide, and is now considered a huge pest in the United States, where it eats all kinds of garden plants as well as the roots of grass.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Otsego Township (near Gaylord), Michigan, USA. Date: 18 July, 2017.
Leslie says, “I never realized that the white spots along the sides and back were little tufts of hair.”
Oriental beetle (Exomala orientalis)
Oriental Beetle, Exomala orientalis, subfamily Rutelinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ This beetle is native to Japan. It was first observed in the United States in 1920, when it was seen in Connecticut. It is now found from the northeastern United States to the Great Lakes region.
Photographed by: Elizabeth Boyle. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: West Milford, New Jersey, USA. Date: 17 July, 2017.
Elizabeth says, “It’s unbelievable how many strange insects I can find in my neck of the woods.”
Garden Chafer (Phyllopertha horticola)
Garden Chafer, Phyllopertha horticola, subfamily Rutelinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ Garden chafers are often seen munching on flowers. This beetle, which grows to about 1.2 cm (half an inch), has hair-covered, brick-red elytra (forewings), and a pair of spines on the side of each foreleg.
Photographed by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 1 August, 2018.
Rose chafers (Macrodactylus subspinosus)
Rose Chafers, Macrodactylus subspinosus, subfamily Melolonthinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ Adult rose chafers eat a lot of things from flower blossoms to fruits (as seen here), and also tree leaves (as shown in the next photo). On leaves, they eat the tissue and leave behind the veins — damage that is known as skeletonizing. Fortunately the adults are only out for about 3 weeks or so in Michigan, which is where this photo was taken. Then the adults lay eggs and die. But they do reappear the following year.
Photographed by: Diane P. Kraus. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Glen Arbor, Michigan, USA. Date: 10 June, 2016.
Diane says, “Wild iris blooms covered with them!”
Rose chafers (Macrodactylus subspinosus)
Rose Chafers, Macrodactylus subspinosus, subfamily Melolonthinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
Photographed by: Bob Boomer. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: East Bay Township (near Traverse City), Michigan, USA. Date: 26 June, 2017.
Bob says, “These bugs are eating the leaves in my trees.”
10-Lined June Beetle (Polyphylla decemlineata)
10-Lined June Beetle, male, Polyphylla decemlineata, subfamily Melolonthinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ The adults can be up to 1.5 inches long, so this is one big beetle! Check out the next photo to see its wild antennae.
Photographed by: Thom Walker. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Sandy, Oregon, USA. Date: August 2013.
10-Lined June Beetle (Polyphylla decemlineata)
10-Lined June Beetle, male, Polyphylla decemlineata, subfamily Melolonthinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ The male has large and robust antennae and when he fans them out, as shown here, he can sense pheromones (chemicals released by the females). This ability comes in handy when it’s time to find a mate.
Photographed by: Erin Hauck. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bend, Oregon, USA. Date: 5 July 2017.
Erin says, “It scared the jeepers out of me. He was a big sucker.”
10-Lined June Beetle (Polyphylla decemlineata)
10-Lined June Beetle, male, Polyphylla decemlineata, subfamily Melolonthinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ This side photograph shows the tall, round body of this species.
Photographed by: Eileen Turk. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bellingham, Washington, USA. Date: 27 June 2017.
10-Lined June Beetle (Polyphylla decemlineata)
10-Lined June Beetle, male, Polyphylla decemlineata, subfamily Melolonthinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ A top view of the previous specimen. Nice photo, Eileen!
Photographed by: Eileen Turk. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Bellingham, Washington, USA. Date: 27 June 2017.
Rainbow Scarab (Phanaeus vindex)
Rainbow Scarab, male, Phanaeus vindex, subfamily Scarabaeinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ Only the male of this species has the horn, and has the metallic sheen. It is a type of dung beetle — the females lay their eggs next to pre-rolled balls of dung. When the eggs hatch, the young feast on the dung.
Photographed by: Brandi Rose Lush. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Berks County, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 3 August, 2017.
Brandi is a preschool teacher! She says, “While out on the playground today, my kids and I found this neat scarab.... Hope to make it on the website. My kids would love that!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “ Hello to Ms. Lush’s class!
Dung Beetle (Gymnopleurus cyaneus)
Dung Beetle in the genus Gymnopleurus, likely Gymnopleurus cyaneus, subfamily Scarabaeinae, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
□ Numerous species are known generically as Dung Beetles. This one is a lovely metallic blue.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified by: Audrey Maran. Location: Nitulemada, Digana, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 18 May, 2016.
Scarab beetle (family Scarabaeidae)
Scarab beetle, family Scarabaeidae (the scarab beetles).
Photographed and identified by: Kaden G. Watson. Location: Whichita Falls, Texas, USA. Date: 14 June, 2017.
Kaden says, “The beetle is 1.5 inches long.”
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Lucanidae, the stag beetles

Reddish Brown Stag Beetle (Lucanus capreolus)
Reddish Brown Stag Beetle, female, (Lucanus capreolus), subfamily Lucaninae, family Lucanidae (the stag beetles).
□ Although the jaws may look large on this female, the jaws on the males are much larger!
Photographed by Tony L. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: central New Jersey, USA. Date: 15 July, 2017.
Reddish Brown Stag Beetle (Lucanus capreolus)
Reddish Brown Stag Beetle, female, (Lucanus capreolus), subfamily Lucaninae, family Lucanidae (the stag beetles).
Photographed by McKinley Sutterfield. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Craig Park, Greenwood, Indiana, USA. Date: 18 August, 2017.
Says 10-year-old McKinley, “It was being very lazy for being at the playground.”
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Hydrophilidae, the water scavenger beetles

Giant Water Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilus spp.)
Giant Water Scavenger Beetle, genus Hydrophilus, subfamily Hydrophilinae, family Hydrophilidae (the water scavenger beetles).
□ These are diving beetles. How do they breathe underwater? They trap a bubble of air under their elytra (the hard wings that cover their backs) — like a scuba tank!
Photographed by: John Link. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: Courtland, Virginia, USA. Date: 3 June, 2017.
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Dytiscidae, the predaceous diving beetles

Predaceous Diving Beetle (Cybister fimbriolatus)
Predaceous Diving Beetle, also known as a Giant Diving Beetle, Cybister fimbriolatus, subfamily Dytiscinae, family Dytiscidae (the predaceous diving beetles).
□ Predaceous Diving Beetles spend much of their lives in the water of ponds and lakes, but they can fly and will often head for streetlights or other lights on land. As noted by the photographer (see below), this one was indeed spotted on land.
Photographed by: Brianna Sutterfield. Identified to family by: Mark Stephens, 2016 Conservation Educator of the Year. Mark runs the wonderful Project F.I.S.H. program in Michigan. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Mount Pleasant, Michigan, USA. Date: 27 February, 2018.
Brianna says, “I found this big guy in a parking lot tonight! He was at least an inch and a half long and about an inch wide!”
Predaceous Diving Beetle (Dytiscus spp.)
Water Tiger, likely in the genus Dytiscus, subfamily Dytiscinae, family Dytiscidae (the predaceous diving beetles).
□ The Water Tiger is the generic name for the larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle. It is a fierce predator with its sharp and strong jaws, which work well to attack and subdue prey. According to the photographer, the local people in Odisha, India, call them hardabhanga, which he said translates to “bone breaker,” so named because their bite is so painful (see the comments below).
Photographed and identified to common name by: Skrahim bakas. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Odisha, India. Date: 31 July, 2018.
Skrahim says, “I found them in a muddy field where farmers are ready to plant paddy crops. Generally this insect has a shrimp-like body structure, and the mouth is like a centipede’s. And it is venomous, equal to scorpion.”

Mordellidae, the pintail beetles or tumbling flower beetles
Melyridae, the soft-winged flower beetles


Tumbling Flower Beetle, (Mordella spp.)
Tumbling Flower Beetle in the genus Mordella, subfamily Mordellinae, family Mordellidae (the pintail beetles or tumbling flower beetles).
□ This is a close-up of one of a pair of beetles Ed found on a Queen Anne’s Lace plant. Queen Anne’s Lace is also known as Wild Carrot. When Tumbling Flower Beetles feel threatened, they do a little jump/tumble maneuver to get themselves in a better position so they can fly away to safety. See the comment below.
Photographed by: Ed Hendrickson. Identified to genus by: entomologist Enrico Ruzzier of the Natural History Museum in London, UK. Identified to genus by: entomologist Enrico Ruzzier of the Natural History Museum in London, UK. Location: North Carolina, USA. Date: 5 May, 2018.
Entomologist Enrico Ruzzier noted that it is “impossible to identify at species level without genitalia dissection.” He made the identification of this photo (and the Hoshihananomia in the next photo) while doing field work in Cuba! Thank you for the ID!
Pintail Beetle (Hoshihananomia spp.)
Pintail Beetle in the genus Hoshihananomia, subfamily Mordellinae, family Mordellidae (the pintail beetles or tumbling flower beetles).
□ This polka-dotted Pintail Beetle has a very noticeable “tail,” which is the pointed end of its abdomen. The photographer described it as “about 1 cm long with pointed spike at end.” See the comment below.
Photographed by: Chandan Kumar. Identified to genus by: entomologist Enrico Ruzzier of the Natural History Museum in London, UK. Location: Kunustoria Colliery, West Bengal, India. Date: 5 May, 2018.
Entomologist Enrico Ruzzier noted that it is “impossible to identify at species level without genitalia dissection.” He made the identification of this photo (and the Mordella in the previous photo) while doing field work in Cuba! Thank you for the ID!
Soft-Winged Flower Beetle (Anthocomus equestris)
Soft-Winged Flower Beetle, Anthocomus equestris, subfamily Malachiinae, family Melyridae (the soft-winged flower beetles).
□ This beetle is an import to North America. It is a Eurasian species.
Photographed by: Susan Reinhardt. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org Location: Bel Air, Maryland, USA. Date: 3 June, 2017.
Susan says, “This is an enlarged photo taken with my iPhone. To the naked eye it is much smaller and is long and thin.”

Elateridae, the click beetles

Eyed Click Beetle (Alaus oculatus)
Eyed Click Beetle, Alaus oculatus, subfamily Agrypninae, family Elateridae (the click beetles).
□ When this large beetle has its legs pulled in and out of sight, it looks more like a fishing lure than a living insect.
Photographed and identified by: Keith Grix. Location: Hadley, Michigan, USA. Date: 1 June, 2014.
Eyed Click Beetle (Alaus oculatus)
Eyed Click Beetle, Alaus oculatus, subfamily Agrypninae, family Elateridae (the click beetles).
□ The “click” part of their name refers to the ability of these beetles to jump due to the presence of a hinge mechanism on their ventral (belly) side. When this mechanism releases, the beetle pops off the ground. If you’re holding one when it clicks, it can be a little startling!
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 12 July, 2011.
Eyed Click Beetle (Alaus oculatus)
Eyed Click Beetle, Alaus oculatus, subfamily Agrypninae, family Elateridae (the click beetles).
□ The “eyed” part of their name refers to the two big black spots on the thorax. They may look like eyes — and the spots are even called “eyespots” but the spots are just colored spots. Their actual eyes are much smaller and located forward on the head.
Photographed by: Earl McKay. Location: Union, Michigan, USA. Date: 19 June, 2016.
Earl says, “Caught this insect, have never seen one like it in my area, ever!”
Eyed Click Beetle (Alaus oculatus)
Eyed Click Beetle, Alaus oculatus, subfamily Agrypninae, family Elateridae (the click beetles).
□ This nice photo of an Eyed Click Beetle also includes a second, smaller creature in the shot. It’s a Pillbug, which is a crustacean, so the Pillbug is more closely related to a lobster than it is to an insect. Seven-year-old Noah spotted this pair in a dead tree (great job, Noah!), and his mom took the photo.
Spotted by: Noah Louvat. Photographed and identified by: Elizabeth Louvat. (Good work on the identification, Elizabeth!) Location: Central Texas, USA. Date: 21 April, 2019.
Flat Wireworm Beetle (Aeolus mellillus)
Flat Wireworm Beetle, Aeolus mellillus, subfamily Agrypninae, family Elateridae (the click beetles).
□ It’s called a flat wireworm beetle after the larva, which looks like a flat, soft, yellowish grub.
Photographed by: Chris M. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Peoria Heights, Illinois, USA. Date: 29 August, 2016.
After learning it is a type of click beetle, Chris says, “It made an amazing jump off my hand, and I think I do recall hearing a click or pop sound.”
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Glowing Click Beetle or Cocuyo (Ignelater havaniensis)
Glowing Click Beetle, or Cocuyo, Ignelater havaniensis, subfamily Agrypninae, family Elateridae (the click beetles).
□ The Glowing Click Beetle is known for the two bioluminescent spots on its elytra. The spots glow freen at night. Another species (Deilelater physoderus) is also called a Glowing Click Beetle or Gold Spot Click Beetle. By comparison, Deilelater physoderus is a bit smaller at 0.6-0.7 inches (1.5–2.0 cm) long, compared to Ignelater havaniensis, which is 1-1.2 inches (2.5–3.0 cm) long; it has noticeable ridges on its elytra, compared to smoother elytra in Ignelater havaniensis; and lacks the tiny spines that Ignelater havaniensis has on the rear end of its elytra (barely visible in the photo at right.
Photographed by: Marv Goldberg. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamarac, Florida, USA. Date: 17 May, 2019.
Marv says, “This guy was pretty big. At least an inch long.”
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Curculionidae, the weevils

Root Weevil, also known as a Chichi (Diaprepes abbreviatus)
Citrus Root Weevil, colloquially known as a Chichí, Diaprepes abbreviatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed by: Darryl Gracey. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Parrish (south of Tampa), Florida, USA. Date: July 2016.
Darryl says, “I’ve not seen one of these before and had to snap it and research.”
Citrus Root Weevil or Chichi (Diaprepes abbreviatus)
Citrus Root Weevil, known locally in the Caribbean as a Chichí, Diaprepes abbreviatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ Information about this insect, which has become a major pest on citrus since it was introduced to Florida in 1964, is available here.
Photographed by: Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: north side of Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Date: 30 July 2017.
Carlo says, “I found this little guy crawling up the wall in a house.... Thanks for the cool website!” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Glad you like it!”
Citrus Root Weevil or Chichi (Diaprepes abbreviatus)
Citrus Root Weevil, known locally in the Caribbean as a Chichí, Diaprepes abbreviatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ The top-down view of the previous specimen. It is a pretty weevil!
Photographed by: Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: north side of Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Date: 30 July 2017.
Citrus Root Weevil or Chichi (Diaprepes abbreviatus)
Citrus Root Weevil, known locally in the Caribbean as a Chichí, Diaprepes abbreviatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ This particular Citrus Root Weevil lacks the typical striped pattern of this species. Compare it to the others on this page to see the difference.
Photographed by: Marv Goldberg. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamarac, Florida, USA. Date: unknown.
Strawberry Root Weevil (Otiorhynchus ovatus)
Rough Strawberry Root Weevil, Otiorhynchus rugosostriatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed and identified to genus by Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist) Identified to species by: entomologist Robert S. Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature. Thank you, Dr. Anderson! Location: northern Ohio, USA. Date: 28 June 2016.
Kelly says, “Found this ‘lifer insect’ in my bathroom today. Very cool!”
Black Vine Weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus)
Black Vine Weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ This Black Vine Weevil is one of the group of weevils known as broad-nosed weevils. Compared to some of the other weevils in this family, this weevil’s snout is much shorter and broader.
Photographed by: Dave Delman. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: New York, USA. Date: 13 December, 2017.
Black Vine Weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus)
Black Vine Weevil, probably Otiorhynchus sulcatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ This Black Vine Weevil has a lighter color than normal. This is likely due to its age — as they get older, the color can lighten, so this is probably an old individual, according to entomologist Robert S. Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature.
Photographed by: Barb Auge. Identified by: entomologist Robert S. Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature. Thank you, Dr. Anderson!
Location: Minnesota, USA. Date: 23 March, 2018.
Fuller Rose Weevil (Naupactus cervinus)
Fuller Rose Weevil, Naupactus cervinus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ According to North Carolina State Extension, the Fuller Rose Weevil feeds on all sorts of plants from maple and citrus trees to azalea and other flowers, and also is common in the vegetable garden on beans and potatoes. For more informaiton on this insect, click here.
Photographed by: Israel Suarez. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lewisville, North Carolina, USA. Date: 7 December, 2017.
Israel says, “It’s about half a centimeter in length.”
Broad Nosed Weevil (Ophryastes spp.)
Broad Nosed Weevil, probably in the genus Ophryastes, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ This genus is a group of weevils that are common to desert areas in the southwestern United States.
Photographed by: Juan Jesus Hernadez. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Palm Springs, California, USA. Date: March 2017.
Sri Lankan Weevil (Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus)
Sri Lankan Weevil, Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ This Sri Lankan Weevil made its way from Sri Lanka to Florida in 2000, and now it is in about half the counties in Florida, mostly the southern half of the state. It looks almost identical to another weevil called the Little Leaf Notcher (Artipus floridanus), which is native to Florida and the Caribbean. Two of the features that set the Sri Lankan Weevil apart are a slightly yellowish head (difficult to see here) and spines on its femur (noted with the yellow arrow). For more information on this species, click here.
Photographed and identified as a weevil by: Marv Goldberg. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamarac, Florida, USA. Date: 18 January, 2019.
Sri Lankan Weevil (Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus)
Sri Lankan Weevil, Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ The Sri Lankan Weevil was introduced to Florida, where this photo was taken. It looks almost identical to a Florida-native species called the Little Leaf Notcher (Artipus floridanus). The two can be distinguished perhaps most easily by looking at the “shoulders”. They are squared off in the Sri Lankan Weevil — almost as it it is wearing shoulder pads or military epaulets — whereas the Little Lead Notcher has smoothly rounded shoulders.
Photographed by: Gail Sciarrone. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Lake Worth, West Palm Beach, Florida, USA. Date: 22 October, 2018.
Broad-Nosed Weevil (Myllocerus spp.)
Broad-Nosed Weevil in the genus Myllocerus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed and identified as a weevil by: K J Westman. Tentatively identified to genus by: Mahendran Govindasamy. Location: Nithulemada, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 10 January, 2018. K J says, “It looks like it is some textile toy for kids.”
Imported Long-Horned Weevil (Calomycterus setarius)
Imported Long-Horned Weevil, Calomycterus setarius, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ Native to Japan, the Imported Long-Horned Weevil is now very common in much of the eastern United States and southeastern Canada, where they have become aguicultural pests on soybeans, alfalfa and other crops. The “seta” in the species name of setarius is Latin for bristles, and refers to the parallel rows of short bristles that run down the abdomen (too small to be visible in this photo).
Photographed and identified as a weevil by: Carolina Torres. Identified to species by: Robert Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature’s Beaty Centre for Species Discovery. Thank you, Dr. Anderson! Location: Galesburg, Illinois, USA. Date: 30 June, 2018.
Pine Weevil (Brachyderes spp.)
Pine Weevil, in the genus Brachyderes, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ The photo of this broad-nosed weevil was taken in the United Kingdom, where two similar species of Pine Weevils are found — for more on the two, click here and here are two species in the UK -- both very similar. You can see the two here and here.
Photographed by: Cee Thompson. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: England, UK. Date: 10 May, 2019.
Cee described this weevil as about 1.2 cm long and 0.5 cm wide (about 1.3 long and 1/5 inch wide).
Broad-Nosed Weevil (Episomus spp.)
Broad-Nosed Weevil in the genus Episomus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed and identified as a weevil by: K J Westman. Tentatively identified to genus by: Mahendran Govindasamy. Location: Nithulemada, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 11 December, 2018.
K J says, “I find it quite intriguing with dots and dimples.”
Broad-Nosed Weevil (Episomus spp.)
Broad-Nosed Weevil in the genus Episomus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed and identified as a weevil by: K J Westman. Tentatively identified to genus by: Mahendran Govindasamy. Location: Nithulemada, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 11 December, 2018.
K J notes the “textiles” look of this weevil. KnowYourInsects.org says, “It looks like it is wearing a knitted sweater!”
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Broad-Nosed Weevil (Catapionus spp.)
Broad-Nosed Weevil, possibly in the genus Catapionus, subfamily Entiminae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed and identified to order by: Shefali Chaudhari. Identified to genus by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Location: Flori. farm, NAU, Navsari, Gujarat. Date: 10 December, 2018.
Vegetable weevil (Listroderes costirostris)
Weevil, probably a Vegetable Weevil, Listroderes costirostris, subfamily Cyclominae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed by: Lynne Nguyen. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Montclair, California, USA. Date: 26 March, 2016.
“I found it on my son’s diaper this morning. (It was a) tad less than 1/4 inch.”
Green immigrant leaf weevil (Polydrusus formosus)
Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil, Polydrusus formosus, subfamily Cyclominae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ The round scales give this little weevil its brilliant metallic-green color. Some of the scales in this individual have worn off — as they sometimes do — so you can see the dark-colored body underneath.
Photographed by: Paul Hinkley. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA. Date: 29 August, 2017.
Leaf-Rolling Weevil (Neoerethistes spp.)
Weevil in the genus Neoerethistes, subfamily Molytinae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed by: Donna Sánchez. Identified to genus by: Macotulio Soto-Hernández, Instituto de Ecología, México. Location: Malinalco, México. Date: 9 July 2017.
Weevil (Curculio spp.)
Weevil in the genus Curculio, subfamily Curculioninae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
Photographed by: Leah Gentry. Identified to genus by: entomologist Robert S. Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature. Thank you, Dr. Anderson! Location: Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida, USA. Date: 3 September 2015.
Leah says, “It was on my mailbox this afternoon! Mailbox sits under a water oak and several other trees.”
Acorn and Nut Weevil (Curculio proboscideus)
Acorn and Nut Weevil, quite possibly Curculio proboscideus, subfamily Curculioninae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ This little insect is just adorable! The super-long snout is a characteristic of females.
Photographed by: Denise Rulason. Identified by KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Frankenmuth, Michigan, USA. Date: 31 August, 2017.
Denise says, “Interesting bug I have never seen before.... I found her under an oak tree.”
European Curculionid Weevil (Rhinusa tetra)
European Curculionid Weevil, also known as a Mullein Weevil, Rhinusa tetra, subfamily Curculioninae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ The European Curculionid Weevil is native to Europe, and parts of Asia and Africa, but also now found in North and South America. It also goes by the name Mullein Weevil, because it eats the plant Common Mullein (Verbascum thapsus), a plant with large, soft, and fuzzy leaves (also sometimes jokingly called nature’s toilet paper). Characteristics of the European Curculionid Weevil include the covering of short hairs, and the beefy-looking femora (thighs).
Photographed by: Dave Delman, M.D. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Roslyn, New York, USA. Date: 10 June, 2018.
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Red Palm Weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus)
Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, subfamily Dryophthorinae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ The Red Palm Weevil comes in a variety of colors (including black with a red stripe), but this rust-colored variation is quite common in Cyprus where this photo was taken. These weevils can grow to about 1.3 inches (3.3 cm) long. Note: The ruler is marked in centimeters (not inches).
Photographed and identified by: Katherine Toumbourou. Location: Nicosia, Cyprus. Date: 16 May, 2018.
Katherine says, “Your wonderful website helped me identity a bug that flew through my window today.” KnowYourInsects.org says, “Wonderful! And great job with the identification, Kath!”
Red Palm Weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus)
Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, subfamily Dryophthorinae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ The Red Palm Weevil is native to southern Asia and over to Papua New Guinea and nearby islands, but has spread to other warm climates as well. For instance, it was first reported in southern California in 2010, but after a concerted effort to find and get rid of it, it was declared eradicated in January 2015.
Photographed and identified by: Katherine Toumbourou. Location: Nicosia, Cyprus. Date: 16 May, 2018.
Katherine says, “They’re a real problem both here and in the Middle East, and are classified as pests.”
Palmetto Weevil (Rhynchophorus cruentatus)
Palmetto Weevil, Rhynchophorus cruentatus, subfamily Dryophthorinae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ Considered the largest weevil in North America, the Palmetto Weevil can grow to about 1.25 inches long (3.1 cm). This species has quite a bit of variability. For instance, this individual has considerable black markings on its head, while others have very little black on their heads, and still others are completely black. For more information on this pretty weevil (and to see some the variation in this species), click here.
Photographed by: Jordan Knepper. Submitted by: Doug Knepper. Location: Tampa, Florida, USA. Date: 10 March, 2018.
Rice Weevil (Sitophilus oryzae)
Rice Weevil, Sitophilus oryzae, subfamily Dryophthorinae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ Rice weevils infest rice as well as several other grains, such as wheat and corn. And be sure to check out the photographer’s comment below. Note: the subfamily Dryophthorinae is not a universally accepted subfamily.
Photographed by: Jim Coolbaugh, a retired U.S. Navy infectious disease research microbiologist. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: in the sea near Malaysia. Date: 24 November, 2017.
Jim says, “We are on a sailboat in Malaysia, and have an infestation of these insects. They are about 2mm long, and they fly.” In an update, Jim says they found the source of the infestation: “They are coming from some stored, and thought-sealed pasta.... Out you weevils!”
Agave or Sisal Weevil (Scyphophorus acupunctatus)
Sisal Weevil, sometimes called an Agave Weevil, Scyphophorus acupunctatus, subfamily Dryophthorinae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ This weevil is known as a Sisal Weevil because its host plant is a type of agave called sisal (Agave sisalana), which is often used to make twine or rope.
Photographed by: Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Date: 7 January, 2018.
Rose Curculio, Merhynchites bicolor
Rose Curculio, Merhynchites bicolor, subfamily Rhynchitinae, family Curculionidae (the weevils).
□ The Rose Curculio weevil is mainly brick-red in color, but with black legs and a long, black proboscis. Another feature of this weevil is pair of antennae. Most other weevils have elbowed antennae, but the Rose Curculio has straight antennae (no bend!).
Photographed by: Dave Delman, M.D. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Roslyn, New York, USA. Date: 10 June, 2018.

Brentidae, the primitive weevils

Brentid weevil (Arrhenodes minutus)
Brentid Weevil, also known as an Oak Timberworm Weevil, male, Arrhenodes minutus, subfamily Brentinae, family Brentidae (the primitive weevils).
□ To tell a male from a female in this species, look at the mouthparts. This male has a rather robust pair of jaws, whereas the female has an elongate, tube-shaped beak.
Photographed by: Ray Chin. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Toronto, Canada. Date: 7 January, 2018.
Brentid weevil (Arrhenodes minutus)
Brentid Weevil, also known as an Oak Timberworm Weevil, male, Arrhenodes minutus, subfamily Brentinae, family Brentidae (the primitive weevils).
□ Why is is called an Oak Timberworm? The larva of this weevil looks rather like a worm and bores into wood, especially oak.
Photographed by: Mary Freelove. Identified by: E. Richard Hoebeke, entomologist with the University of Georgia Extension. Thank you, Rick! Location: northern Georgia, USA. Date: 30 April, 2016.
Brentid weevil (Arrhenodes minutus)
Brentid Weevil, also known as an Oak Timberworm Weevil, male, Arrhenodes minutus, subfamily Brentinae, family Brentidae (the primitive weevils).
□ This Brentid Weevil has a little less of the yellow markings on its elytra (the wings covering its abdomen) than is typical.
Photographed and identified to order by: Jaymie Miller. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: middle Tennessee, USA. Date: 19 May, 2019.

Attelabidae, the leaf-rolling weevils

Hazel Leaf-Roller (Apoderus coryli)
Hazel Leaf-Roller, Apoderus coryli, subfamily Attelabinae, family Attelabidae (the leaf-rolling weevils).
□ The Hazel Leaf-Roller is so named because the young live inside rolled-up leaves of hazel trees and shrubs.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 29 July, 2018.
Leaf-rolling weevil (Homoeolabus analis)
Leaf-Rolling Weevil, Homoeolabus analis, subfamily Attelabinae, family Attelabidae (the leaf-rolling weevils).
□ Females of this family of weevils lay an egg on a leaf, roll up the leaf (like rolling up a rug) with the egg inside. This protects the egg and the larva that later hatches from the egg.
Photographed by: Joan Smith. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tampa, Florida, USA. Date: 9 June, 2017.
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Lycidae, the net-winged beetles

End Band Net-Wing Beetle (Calopteron terminale)
End Band Net-Wing Beetle with its forewings up, Calopteron terminale, family Lycidae (the net-winged beetles).
□ With its forewings up and out of the way, the hind wings become visible.
Photographed by: Claire M.Montgomery. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: southern Louisiana, USA. Date: 1 September, 2014.
End Band Net-Wing Beetle (Calopteron terminale)
End Band Net-Wing Beetle, Calopteron terminale, family Lycidae (the net-winged beetles).
□ Similar-looking species include Calopteron discrepans and Calopteron reticulatum, which share the common name of Banded Net-Wing Beetle. Both have an additional black band running through the center of their forewings, whereas the End Band Net-Wing typically only has one band on the end of the forewings, as shown here.
Photographed by: Claire M.Montgomery. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: southern Louisiana, USA. Date: 1 September, 2014.
Banded Net-Wing Beetle (Calopteron reticulatum)
Banded Net-Wing Beetle, Calopteron reticulatum, family Lycidae (the net-winged beetles).
□ There are two species of Banded Net-Wing Beetle — Calopteron discrepans and Calopteron reticulatum — both of which have a black band across the middle of each of the two forewings (also known as elytra). The difference between the two is that Calopteron discrepans has a band that is the same width all the way across the wing, while Calopteron reticulatum has a band that is wider where the two elytra meet and tapers off toward the outer sides. This photo seems to show the band tapering, so it is identified as Calopteron reticulatum.
Photographed by: Jim Hartzel. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Burke, Virginia, USA. Date: 11 July, 2018.
Net-Winged Beetle (Thonalmus chevrolati)
Net-Wing Beetle, Thonalmus chevrolati, family Lycidae (the net-winged beetles).
□ These two photos show both pairs of this Net-Wing Beetle’s wings. The forewings (called elytra) are stiffer and bicolored, with the rear half of each forewing having a blue or green metallic sheen depending on how the light strikes them. The hindwings, which are used for flight, are membranous.
Photographed by: Juraj Bajgar. Submitted by: Clara Berger. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico. Date: 30 November, 2018.
Clara says that Juraj caught this pretty beetle, which was 1.3 cm (a half inch) long in flight. She adds, “The bug posed for the picture and flew away.”

Zopheridae, the ironclad beetles and the cylindrical bark beetles

Southwestern Ironclad Beetle (Zopherus nodulosus)
Southwestern Ironclad Beetle, Zopherus nodulosus, family Zopheridae (the ironclad beetles and the cylindrical bark beetles)
□ If they are touched or feel threatened, these beetles will draw in their legs and play dead. They are quite impressive beetles in color and size, and can reach about 2 inches (5 cm) long.
Photographed by: Cedia Miller. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Unknown. Date: 2 May, 2016.
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Nitidulidae, the sap beetles

Four-spotted sap beetle (Glischrochilus quadrisignatus)
Four-Spotted Sap Beetle, Glischrochilus quadrisignatus, family Nitidulidae (the sap beetles).
□ Love that shadow above the beetle!
Photographed and identified by: Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Location: northern Ohio, USA. Date: July 2016.
Small Hive Beetle (Aethina tumida)
Sap Beetle, probably a Small Hive Beetle, Aethina tumida, Nitidulidae (the sap beetles).
□ This specimen (yes, it’s a bit crushed) is tiny. It is originally from sub-Saharan Africa, and was first seen in the United States in the late 1990s in a commercial bee hive. Since then it has since spread all across the country.
Photographed by: Harold Vines. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA. Date: 9 March, 2017.
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Buprestidae, the metallic wood-boring beetles

Flat-Headed hardwood borer (Dicerca divaricata)
Flat-Headed Hardwood Borer, Dicerca divaricata (possibly Dicerca tenebrica), subfamily Chrysochroinae, family Bupestridae (the metallic wood-boring beetles).
□ The color of this metallic species ranges from more of a copper/brown-gray color to a bluish tone (like this one).
Photographed by Hannah Lipshutz. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Rochester, New York, USA. Date: 28 May, 2017.
Flat-Headed hardwood borer (Dicerca divaricata)
Flat-Headed Hardwood Borer, either Dicerca divaricata or Dicerca tenebrica, subfamily Chrysochroinae, family Bupestridae (the metallic wood-boring beetles).
Photographed by Maeve Pernot. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Accord, New York, USA. Date: 21 May, 2018.
Maeve says, “This insect came to say hi to me today: It just flew over and landed on my finger! It looked brownish-gray with a gold sheen.”
Jewel beetle (Buprestis laeviventris)
Jewel Beetle, Buprestis laeviventris, subfamily Buprestinae, family Bupestridae (the metallic wood-boring beetles).
Photographed by Shelli St. Clair. Identified to family by: Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Identified to species by Michael S. Caterino of Clemson University. Location: Sonora, California, USA. Date: 10 June, 2016.
Shelli says, “This flew into my hair today! I&rsquolve never seen one like it before. Beautiful, isn't it?”
Striated Borer (Buprestis striata)
Striated Borer, Buprestis striata, family Bupestridae (the metallic wood-boring beetles).
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Otsego Township, Gaylord, Michigan, USA. Date: 18 July, 2017.
Leslie says, “Although the color doesn’t show up perfectly in this photo, it was a bronze metallic color with reddish stripes running down the back.”
Bupestrid beetle (family Bupestridae)
Bupestrid Beetle, family Bupestridae (the metallic wood-boring beetles).
Photographed by Charles Lerable. Identified to family by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Monterey, California, USA. Date: 10 September, 2016.
Charles says, “This insect’s size is approximately 0.7 inches and appears to have wings, although I have not observed them flying.... They appear all seasons and are visible day and night.”
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Passalidae, the bessbugs or betsy beetles
Cucujidae, the flat-back beetles


Bessbug, also known as a Betsy Beetle (family Passalidae)
Bessbug, also known as a Betsy Beetle, family Passalidae (the bessbugs or betsy beetles).
□ Those little red bumps on its head are actually a whole lot of red mites! (The mites often take free rides on passing insects.) If you look closely, you can see a single “horn” in the middle of the head — protruding from the mass of mites. The horn is a characteristic feature of the bessbugs.
Photographed and identified to order by: Moira Richardson. Identified to family by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Oklahoma, USA. Date: 19 June, 2017.
Add your photo here! Flat Bark Beetle (family Cucujidae)
Flat Bark Beetle, family Cucujidae (the flat-bark beetles).
Photographed and identified by: Kelly McKinne (@gonzonaturalist). Location: Black Swamp Bird Observatory, Oak Harbor, Ohio, USA. Date: 12 April, 2015.

Coccinellidae, the ladybugs or ladybird beetles

Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle (Coccinella septempunctata)
Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle, also known as Seven-Spot Ladybug, larva Coccinella septempunctata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ The Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle does indeed have seven spots: three smaller spots on each of the two forewings (or elytra) and one larger one that spreads onto the front of both elytra (between the two white spots). This is quite a common species in Europe.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: unknown.
Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle (Coccinella septempunctata)
Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle, also known as Seven-Spot Ladybug, Coccinella septempunctata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ This head-on view of the Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle shows the pair of small white dots on its head, the larger white spots on either side of its pronotum (the shield that covers the thorax), and the pair of white spots at the front of its forewings (elytra).
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size image here Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 4 November, 2018.
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Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle (Coccinella septempunctata)
Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle, also known as Seven-Spot Ladybug, larva, Coccinella septempunctata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ Gardeners like Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle larvae because they prey on plant-damaging aphids. A close look at this photo will reveal an aphid crawling on this larva’s back.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size image here Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 12 March, 2018.
Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle (Coccinella septempunctata)
Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle, also known as Seven-Spot Ladybug, larva, Coccinella septempunctata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ The larva of the Seven-Spot Ladybird Beetle can be distinguished from other ladybird beetle larvae by the red markings on its abdomen. It has no red markings past the fourth abdominal segment (abdominal segments are noted as A1, A2, A3, etc.; the three segments of the thorax are labeled as T1, T2 and T3).
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s original, full-size image here Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 12 March, 2018.
Orange Ladybird Beetle (Halyzia sedecimguttata)
Orange Ladybird Beetle, Halyzia sedecimguttata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ The Orange Ladybird Beetle was once quite rare, but is now becoming more common in the UK.
Photographed and identified by: Yvonne Ugarte. Location: Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK. Date: 17 October, 2016.
Yvonne says, “I do not see these very often. It has been very mild so far though (this fall).”
Red Ladybird Beetle (Cycloneda sanguinea)
Red Ladybird Beetle (or Red Ladybug) larva, Cycloneda sanguinea, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ This is the larva of the Red Ladybird Beetle. The adult is one of the “spotless” ladybird beetles, so called because its elytra (the hard wings that cover most of the insect) are completely red with no spots.
Photographed by Sue Sifford. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Gulf Coast of Texas near Galveston, USA. Date: 1 March, 2017.
Sue says, “Found it on our orange tree.”
Three-banded ladybug (Coccinella trifasciata)
Three-Banded Ladybug (or 3-Banded Lady Beetle), Coccinella trifasciata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ Often, Three-Banded Ladybugs are orange with black bands that are outlined in yellow, but sometimes (as in this one) they are yellow with black bands.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Houghton Lake, Roscommon County, Michigan, USA. Date: 7 July, 2017.
Leslie says, “Such a pretty little ladybug!”
20-Spotted Ladybird Beetle (Psyllobora vigintimaculata)
20-Spotted Ladybird Beetle (or 20-Spotted Ladybug), Psyllobora vigintimaculata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ Depending on which spots you count, you might end up with more than 20. Nonetheless, there are a lot of spots on this beetle!
Photographed and identified by: Damian Duron. Location: Watsonville, California, USA. Date: 19 October, 2017.
Damian says, “This guy is itty bitty, it’s around 5 mm? That was taken on my very old formica counter.” KnowYourInsects.org replies, “Nice estimation on size, Damian! This beetle is indeed tiny, growing to about 3 mm long.”
15-spotted ladybug (Anatis labiculata)
15-Spotted Ladybug (or 15-spotted Lady Beetle), Anatis labiculata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ Typically, the 15-spotted Ladybug indeed has 15 black spots on a light-gray to orange background. As they age, however, they sometimes become quite dark, like this one, although the black spots are still visible.
Photographed by: Jane Weaver. Submitted by: Jane’s friend Lisa Hechler. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Algonquin Lake, Hastings, Michigan, USA. Date: 5 May, 2018.
15-spotted ladybug (Anatis labiculata)
15-Spotted Ladybug (or 15-spotted Lady Beetle), Anatis labiculata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ This is another older 15-Spotted Ladybug with even darker coloration than the previous photo.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Houghton Lake, Roscommon County, Michigan, USA. Date: 7 July, 2017.
Leslie says, “I met a woman who told me she was seeing ticks all over the place, and it turned out to be these brownish-black ladybugs!”
10-Spot Ladybird Beetle (Adalia decempunctata)
10-Spot Ladybird Beetle, Adalia decempunctata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ The 10-Spot Ladybird Beetle is quite a variable species. This specimen has 10 spots, but not all of them do. To see the considerable variation within this species, click here (on naturespot.org.uk).
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 2 January, 2018.
Bryan says, “Looks like a tortoise, but it’s only 4mm long! Two shots of it, one with wings partly unfurled.”
14-Spot Ladybird Beetle (Propylea quattuordecimpunctata)
10-Spot Ladybird Beetle, Propylea quattuordecimpunctata, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ The spots on the back of a 14-Spot Ladybird Beetle often run together, as they do on the beetle in this photo. To see the variation within this species, click here (on naturespot.org.uk).
Photographed and identified to family by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 11 May, 2019.
Spotless Lady Beetle (Cycloneda sanguinea)
Spotless Lady Beetle, Cycloneda sanguinea, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ Not surprisingly, the Spotless Lady Beetle has no spots on the elytra (hardened forewings). It does have a distinctive pattern on her pronotum: a white outline and two white spots on a black background. The white outline in the male continues around the front of the pronotum and has an extra white line partially down the center of the pronotum (photo here on bugguide.net). In the female, the white line is broken in the front of the pronotum and she has no extra white line (photo here).
Photographed by: Marv Goldberg. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Tamarac, Florida, USA. Date: 5 April, 2019.
Marv says, “I don’t believe I ever saw a no-spotted ladybug before (I swear, I didn’t paint it).”
Convergent Ladybug (Hippodamia convergens)
Convergent Ladybug, Hippodamia convergens, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ The Convergent Ladybug is native to North America. This species has a black pronotum (the shield over the thorax) outlined in white, and decorated with a pair of white, slightly curved markings. Each elytra (forewing) has a large black spot in front, followed by a pair of small black spots, and a trio of large black spots at the rear.
Photographed by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s original, full-size image here Location: San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 21 August, 2016.
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Harlequin ladybird beetle (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (also known as Asian Ladybug), Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ Harlequin Ladybird Beetles come in a wide range of color patterns, but this is one of the most common. This species is native to eastern Asia, and was purposely introduced to Europe as well as North America to control pests, such as aphids. It is now common in its new environs.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Houghton Lake, Roscommon County, Michigan, USA. Date: 7 July, 2017.
Harlequin ladybird beetle (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (also known as a Multicolored Asian Ladybird Beetle or an Asian Ladybug), Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ This Harlequin Ladybird Beetle has white “cheeks” (actually the sides of the pronotum), while many other individuals in this species are decorated with a white “W”. This page has a few photos of Harlequins posted to show some of the wide variation in colors and patterns within this species.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Houghton Lake, Roscommon County, Michigan, USA. Date: 7 July, 2017.
Harlequin ladybird beetle (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (also known as Asian Ladybug), Harmonia axyridis,, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ For more information about Harlequins and misinformation about sexually transmitted diseases (see photographer’s comment below), click here.
Photographed and identified by: Bryan Wenham-Baker (@BryanPhotos). Location: Ivybridge, South Hams, South Devon, England, UK. Date: 11 October, 2018.
Bryan says, “In certain UK areas, Manchester, Birmingham, Loughborough and Gloucester as example towns, there are swarms of Harlequins, extra spots, or black, invading various premises including people’s houses. Residents are concerned about their carrying of STDs, but authorities (are) trying to educate people that they are not harmful to humans.”
Harlequin ladybird beetle (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (also known as Asian Ladybug), Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ Although native to Southeast Asia, Harlequin Ladybird Beetles are now found in North and South America, throughout Europe and Asia, and in Africa.
Photographed by Yvonne Ugarte. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK. Date: 17 October, 2016.
Harlequin ladybird beetle (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (also known as Asian Ladybug), Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ This Harlequin Ladybird Beetle has minimal spotting, while some other members of this species have 20 or more spots.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Houghton Lake, Roscommon County, Michigan, USA. Date: 7 July, 2017.
Asian Ladybird Beetles (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetles (also known as Asian Multicolored Ladybugs), Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ The wide color variation among Harlequin Ladybird Beetles is evident in this swarm on an apple.
Photographed and identified as ladybugs by: John Hayes. Identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Maple Park, Illinois, USA. Date: 21 October, 2017.
Harlequin ladybird beetle larva (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (also known as Asian Ladybug), larva, Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ Take at look at the collection of photos that follow — They are all the same species! They are amazingly diverse.
Photographed by Yvonne Ugarte. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK. Date: 17 October, 2016.
Asian Ladybird Beetle Larva (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (also known as Asian Ladybug), larva, Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ This insect species takes on a number of different color patterns as an adult, as you can see here: http://bugguide.net/node/view/397.
Photographed by Dick Ford. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Marsolan, Midi-Pyrénées, southwest France. Date: 28 May, 2017.
Dick says, “I live in southwest France, where we have been devastated by the box tree moth caterpillar (Cydalima perspectalis) which is gobbling up box hedges throughout the countryside. Searching for the beastly thing in my box hedge I came across this chap.”
Ladybug larva (Harmonia axyridis)
Ladybug larva, probably the Harlequin Ladybird Beetle, Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ This larva was about the size of a large grain of rice.
Photographed by Rhonda Baxter. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Dearborn, Michigan, USA. Date: 8 June, 2016.
Rhonda says, “The larva survived and grew! I put it out on my rosebush. I was wondering if it made it through to an adult today, and as I was eating my dinner, this ladybug landed on my window screen across from me. It is the only one I have seen around my house at all this year. I am hoping it was the one I saved. I guess I am a crazy bug lady. LOL.”
Ladybug larva (Harmonia axyridis)
Harlequin Ladybird Beetle (also known as Asian Ladybug), larva, Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
Photographed by Carlo Castoro. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Duff Park, Monroeville, Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 4 Octover, 2014.
Ladybug pupa (Harmonia axyridis)
Ladybug pupa, probably the Harlequin Ladybird Beetle, Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
Photographed by Rachel Van Horn. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Cedar Springs, Michigan, USA. Date: 10 June, 2016.
Rachel says, “I realized after I sent it that it was some kind of pupa, because there was just a casing left a few hours later and our little guy was gone.”
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Ladybug pupa (Harmonia axyridis)
Ladybug pupa, probably the Harlequin Ladybird Beetle, Harmonia axyridis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
Photographed and identified to family by: Thomas Langhans. See Thomas’s full-size image here. Location: city of San Bruno, county of San Mateo, California, USA. Date: 29 March, 2019.
Ladybug larva (Harmonia eucharis)
Ladybug, larva, Harmonia eucharis, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ The larvae of this species all have these lovely cream-colored markings on the abdomen — almost like embroidery looped stitches. The adults of this species, however, come in a wide color and pattern variation, as shown here.
Photographed by: Syed Gazanfar. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Kashmir, India. Date: 23 April, 2018.
Ladybug larva (Scymnus spp.)
Ladybug larva in the genus Scymnus, possibly Scymnus (Pullus) castaneus, family Coccinellidae (the ladybugs or ladybird beetles).
□ This unusual-looking ladybug larva looks like it is adorned with tufts of white cotton.
Photographed by: Arkopal Gupta. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: district Alipurduar, state west Bengal, India. Date: 28 February, 2011.

Lampyridae, the fireflies or lightningbugs

Winter Firefly (Ellychnia corrusca)
Winter Firefly, also known as Diurnal or Day-Flying Firefly, Ellychnia corrusca, family Lampyridae (the fireflies or lightningbugs).
□ The winter firefly is distinguished from the black firefly (Lucidota atra), which occupies a somewhat similar range, by being larger, lighter in coloration, and having thinner antennae.
Photographed by: Leslie Mertz. Identified by: Jackie Lucier. Location: Kalkaska County, Michigan, USA. Date: 28 May, 2012.
Winter Firefly (Ellychnia corrusca)
Winter Firefly, also known as Diurnal or Day-Flying Firefly, Ellychnia corrusca, family Lampyridae (the fireflies or lightningbugs).
□ Winter fireflies are not only diurnal, but as adults age they no longer light up (bioluminesce). Larvae and pupae both bioluminesce, as do newly metamorphosed adult fireflies.
Photographed and identified by: Leslie Mertz. Location: Gaylord, Otsego County, Michigan, USA. Date: 27 May, 2017.
Firefly larva (family Lampyridae) or net-winged beetle larva (Lycidae)
Either a larva of a firefly, family Lampyridae (the fireflies or lightningbugs) OR of a net-winged beetle, family Lycidae (the net-winged beetles).
□ Even though these beetles are in two separate families, their larvae are essentially indistinguishable. Either way, this a a cool larva ... and check out that retractable head!
Photographed by: Eric Smith. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Hoover, Alabama, USA. Date: 8 February, 2017.
Firefly larva (family Lampyridae) or net-winged beetle larva (Lycidae)
Either a larva of a firefly, family Lampyridae (the fireflies or lightningbugs) OR of a net-winged beetle, family Lycidae (the net-winged beetles).
□ With the plates on the back, the weird retractable head, and the long body, it is hard to believe that this could be a larva (immature) of a firefly!
Photographed by: Maiya Patrick. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Southwest Michigan, USA. Date: 26 April, 2018.
Maiya says, “I did get to see the head pop out! It was really cool.”
Firefly larva (family Lampyridae) or net-winged beetle larva (Lycidae)
Either a larva of a firefly, family Lampyridae (the fireflies or lightningbugs) OR of a net-winged beetle, family Lycidae (the net-winged beetles).
Photographed by: Cheryl Hennessy. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Prince’s Grant estate in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Date: 13 January, 2018.
Cheryl says, “Could be a firefly larva as we have observed one in a similar location. I have never seen this little one before, which is why I am so curious. It also uses its abdomen in locomotion, and the end of its abdomen has small appendages which it can use to grip.”
Lampyrid larva (Nyctophila caucasica)
Larva of a firefly, possibly Nyctophila caucasica, family Lampyridae (the fireflies or lightningbugs).
□ This larva is shown curled up. Such a posture helps to protect the softer underside of the insect from predators.
Photographed by: K J Westman. Identified to family by: Audrey Maran. Tentatively identified to species by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Nitulemada, Digana, Rajawella, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Date: 11 July, 2014.
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Unless noted otherwise, photographs on this website are the property of the photographers and may not be reused without written permission from the photographers. To obtain permission, request it here.

Photos at the top of this website are (from left to right): potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) — photo credit: Scott Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture; ebony jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata)— photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; sweat bee (Agapostemon splendens) — photo credit: Natalie Allen and Stephanie Kolski, U.S. Geological Survey; preying mantis, monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), hellgrammite (aka toe biter) larva and eyed click beetle (Alaus oculatus) — photo credit: Leslie Mertz; Halloween pennant (Celithemis eponina) — photo credit: Kay Meng, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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