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*** Note: KnowYourInsects.org does its best to include correct identifications of insect photos. It's always possible that we made a mistake, however, so if you see a misidentification, please contact us and we will correct it. Thanks!

Aphids of the Superfamily Aphidoidea, which in in the Suborder Sternorrhyncha of the Order Hemiptera — Examples
Aphids
Aphids, family Aphididae, Order Hemiptera (the true bugs).
Photographed by Milosh Rankovic. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ontario, Canada. Date: 12 October, 2016. Says Milosh, “They are gathering in the corner of the outside wall and garden door. Looks to me, they are looking for some warmer place.... Temperatures are getting colder — about 5C — during the night.”
Aphids
Aphids, family Aphididae, Order Hemiptera (the true bugs).
□ Aphids have an interesting relationship with ants. Aphids suck up lots of sweet plant juices and their waste products are also sweet. In fact, their waste products are called honeydew! Ants love sweet things and will congregate among the aphids so they can eat up the aphids’ honeydew.
Photographed by Milosh Rankovic. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: Ontario, Canada. Date: 12 October, 2016.
Woolly Aphids
Woolly Aphids, subfamily Eriosomatinae, family Aphididae, Order Hemiptera (the true bugs).
□ Woolly Aphids are sometimes called Fairyflies or Angelflies, and it’s easy to see why with that cottony white covering! Actually, the “cotton” is a collection of wax filaments.
Photographed by: Janvier Petto. Identified by: KnowYourInsects.org. Location: northeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Date: 19 July, 2017. Janvier says, “They were all over hostas and no more than 1/2" long (if that).”


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Unless noted otherwise, photographs on this website are the property of the photographers and may not be reused without written permission from the photographers. To obtain permission, email the photographers here. High-resolution versions of the photographs are available.

Photos at the top of this website are (from left to right): potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) — photo credit: Scott Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture; ebony jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata)— photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; sweat bee (Agapostemon splendens) — photo credit: Natalie Allen and Stephanie Kolski, U.S. Geological Survey; preying mantis, monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), hellgrammite (aka toe biter) larva and eyed click beetle (Alaus oculatus) — photo credit: Leslie Mertz; Halloween pennant (Celithemis eponina) — photo credit: Kay Meng, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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